National News

For Player At Center Of NFL Bullying Story, A New Opportunity

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 09:52

Former Miami Dolphins player Jonathan Martin has been traded to the San Francisco 49ers. Martin's departure from Miami prompted an in-depth investigation of the Dolphins by the NFL.

» E-Mail This

SXSW: Tech Industry Inspires New Shows From HBO, AMC

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 09:36

The moneyed world of tech startups is getting a sendup from Mike Judge and a dramatic treatment from AMC. Both programs explore the people who, for better or worse, are changing the way we live.

» E-Mail This

Why Did The Possibly Pregnant Shark Cross The Atlantic?

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 09:30

Probably not just to get to the other side. Thanks to a tracking device, researchers and anyone on the Web have watched as "Lydia" has gone where no great white shark has been tracked before.

» E-Mail This

Rosario Dawson: From Cesar Chavez to Twitter

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 09:10

Rosario Dawson was one of many celebrities in attendance at SXSW in Austin, Texas, this week. The actress, who has appeared in movies like Quentin Tarantino's "Death Proof" and the comic-inspired film "Sin City," appeared on a panel entitled "What Would Cesar Chavez Tweet?", a perfect tie in for her to share how best to mobilize and engage Latinos in the digital space, while also promoting her new movie.

Dawson is playing labor leader Dolores Huerta in an upcoming biopic that chronicles the life of the late civil rights activist, Cesar Chavez. Dawson says the movie brought back memories of her own family's involvement in unions as she was growing up.

"My great-grandmother worked in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, I came from people who were inspired by Cesar," Dawson says. "To look at it, to look at what they were doing, they were poor people helping poor people, passing on messages, just literally person-to-person. 'Psst, pass it on, march on Friday.' Pre-twitter."

Dawson was here in Austin not just to promote her new film, but also to talk about a project she's working on with her longtime friend and business partner, Abrima Erwiah. The project is called Studio 189, and it's an e-commerce platform that the duo has launched that curates the traditional artisan work of African artists and sells those products online to consumers.

Even though Africa is often overlooked as a place where entrepreneurship and innovation can really thrive, Dawson sees great growth potential, "When you have the median age in Africa being 18.6 and sub-Saharan Africa is expected to have two-thirds of the youth of the world by 2100, you are really looking at a very active, very present, very engaged community and it's really exciting to be working and partnering with folks who are really into it."

Rosario Dawson isn't new to advocating for underserved communities. She is a co-founder of Voto Latino, a 10-year old organization whose mission is to empower Latino Millennials and increase their engagement on a number of social and economic issues. Since its inception, Voto Latino has registered nearly a quarter of a million voters, and according to Dawson, they achieved an important first in the digital space.

"We were the first ones to use texting, to get people to register to vote," Dawson says. "Latino millennials are a very high number, and they really need a pathway, to being in STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math education], to being able to have jobs and careers that other people aren't [targeting] them for. They are being talked to as only consumers -- and really they are innovators."

This level of advocacy is important to the actress, who points out that social media is an important way to reach and mobilize a very important demographic.

"Social media is in many ways the frontier for activism for people of color especially since they over-index on social media, especially Latinos," Dawson says. "They are the first ones to take on new technology from everything from 3-D televisions to new types of cell phones... They might not have computers but they have cell phones and they use [them] for everything."

Voto Latino is launching a movement they are calling #TrendURVoice as a way to further engage Latino Millennials around issues ranging from immigration to marriage equality to student loan debt. It's not lost on Dawson that the power of social media to help mobilize extends beyond American youth, "Through social media we are able to reach every corner of the earth just about.

"When you look at the uprising in Egypt you see proof positive about how that works. We are seeing it all around the world and it's the thing that gets kids walking out of class or mobilizing around the world."

Israel OKs Controversial Law To Conscript Ultra-Orthodox Jews

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:54

Haredi, a branch of Judaism that shuns modern secular culture, had long been exempt from national service. The bill had been boycotted by the opposition.

» E-Mail This

Who Says Food Porn Has To Be Dominated By Junk Food?

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:39

Carrots don't stand much of a chance against cronuts when it comes to tweets and Instagrams about food. The new Food Porn Index aims to change the conversation by tracking our virtual cravings.

» E-Mail This

Mix Of Gut Microbes May Play Role In Crohn's Disease

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:05

Research involving more than 1,500 patients suggests people with Crohn's may have too many of the types of gut bacteria that tend to rile the immune system and too few that reduce inflammation.

» E-Mail This

PODCAST: Overtime, overworked?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:02

The White House wants to make more Americans eligible for overtime pay. Currently, because of what is referred to as the Fair Labor Standards Act’s "white collar exemption," many salaried professionals are not entitled to extra pay if they work more than 40 hours per week. Later this week, the president intends to use his executive authority to change those rules. For 2014, which he is calling a "year of action," he has promised to pursue policy changes that do not involve congress. So whom would this change affect? "People who are defined as 'supervisors,'" says Gary Burtless, an economist at The Brookings Institution. "They have responsibility over other people besides themselves, a certain amount of independence."

Plus, it's hard enough measuring the mainstream economy. A new report from the Urban Institute has attempted to quantify the underground commercial sex economy. Researchers say in 2007 it was worth about $975 million, in just in seven U.S. cities. Curious about the business expenses of pimps? Check out their online feature for further insight. The Institute reports that pimps most often recruit sex workers from their own social circles. But the Internet is changing business. Bill Woolf is a detective with the Fairfax County Police Department in Virginia. He says most scouting and recruitment of victims by traffickers is now done online.

 

Ex-Missile Crew Members Say Cheating Is Part Of The Culture

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:41

The Air Force has acknowledged a problem with cheating on tests by nuclear missile officers. NPR spoke with eight former officers, and seven said they had participated in some kind of cheating.

» E-Mail This

How The Vice President of New Afrika Became Mayor Of Jackson

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:14

Just how did the late Chokwe Lumumba — a revolutionary who still threw up the Black Power salute on occasion — get elected the mayor of a mid-sized American city in the Deep South?

» E-Mail This

Apartment Building Explodes In Harlem, Killing At Least 2

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:48

The building, located at or near the corner of Park Ave. and 114th Street, reportedly exploded and collapsed around 9:30 a.m. At least two people are dead and many injured.

» E-Mail This

Obama seeks expanded overtime pay

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:44

The White House wants to make more Americans eligible for overtime pay. Currently, because of what is referred to as the Fair Labor Standards Act’s “white collar exemption,” many salaried professionals are not entitled to extra pay if they work more than 40 hours per week.

Later this week, the president intends to use his executive authority to change those rules. For 2014, which he is calling a “year of action,” he has promised to pursue policy changes that do not involve congress.

So whom would this change affect? “People who are defined as ‘supervisors,’” says Gary Burtless, an economist at The Brookings Institution. “They have responsibility over other people besides themselves, a certain amount of independence.”

The economic recovery, Burtless argues, “has been better for profits than wages.” “The government is trying to put its thumb on the scale, helping workers,” he says.

Economist Jared Bernstein, a senior fellow with the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, has pushed for this change for more than a decade, since President George W. Bush expanded the exemption in 2004: 

“We’re talking about millions of workers who would be newly eligible for overtime pay,” he says.

Critics argue changing the exemption would make it harder for businesses to hire new employees, and it could motivate them to trim their payrolls. In the long run, employers could simply reduce a white-collar supervisor’s base pay, so there would be no difference to his overall salary.

Bill Kilberg, a partner with the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, says he “doesn’t know if it is a good idea.” Kilberg suspects the courts will be asked to decide whether or not a rule change would be constitutional. “They can give it deference or not give it deference.”

Obama seeks expanded overtime pay for 'millions'

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:44

The White House wants to make more Americans eligible for overtime pay. Currently, because of what is referred to as the Fair Labor Standards Act’s “white collar exemption,” many salaried professionals are not entitled to extra pay if they work more than 40 hours per week.

Later this week, the president intends to use his executive authority to change those rules. For 2014, which he is calling a “year of action,” he has promised to pursue policy changes that do not involve congress.

So whom would this change affect? “People who are defined as ‘supervisors,’” says Gary Burtless, an economist at The Brookings Institution. “They have responsibility over other people besides themselves, a certain amount of independence.”

The economic recovery, Burtless argues, “has been better for profits than wages.” “The government is trying to put its thumb on the scale, helping workers,” he says.

Economist Jared Bernstein, a senior fellow with the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, has pushed for this change for more than a decade, since President George W. Bush expanded the exemption in 2004: 

“We’re talking about millions of workers who would be newly eligible for overtime pay,” he says.

Critics argue changing the exemption would make it harder for businesses to hire new employees, and it could motivate them to trim their payrolls. In the long run, employers could simply reduce a white-collar supervisor’s base pay, so there would be no difference to his overall salary.

Bill Kilberg, a partner with the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, says he “doesn’t know if it is a good idea.” Kilberg suspects the courts will be asked to decide whether or not a rule change would be constitutional. “They can give it deference or not give it deference.”

VIDEO: San Francisco's Biggest Fire In Years

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:23

A nine-story apartment building that was under construction went up in flames. Firefighters were able to protect nearby buildings.

» E-Mail This

Reports: Obama Will Move To Expand Overtime Pay

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 05:29

The president is expected to tell the Labor Department to change the rules about who is eligible. Critics say that might backfire. Proponents say it would narrow income inequality.

» E-Mail This

Ukraine Won't Fight Russia In Crimea, Acting President Says

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 04:30

"We cannot launch a military operation in Crimea, as we would expose the eastern border and Ukraine would not be protected," Oleksandr Turchynov tells Agence France-Presse.

» E-Mail This

Changing Demographics A Factor In Rhode Island's Gubernatorial Race

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 04:02

In Rhode Island, the Democratic gubernatorial primaries are disputed by an Italian-American state treasurer, Providence's first Latino mayor and the grandson of former U.S. Sen. Claiborne Pell.

» E-Mail This

Officials Seem To Have No Clue About Fate Of Missing Jet

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 03:15

The search continues, and continues to expand, for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared Saturday while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. There were 239 people on board.

» E-Mail This

How El Niño will impact global food prices

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 00:58

Climatologists in the U.S. and elsewhere are starting to predict a likely El Niño weather pattern in the coming year. That’s when changes in the temperature on the ocean surface in one part of the world create all kinds of unusual weather in lots of other places: rains in Florida, droughts in Australia. What might that mean for global food prices?  

"Wait and see," says Scott Shellady, a commodities trader on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, an executive with Trean Group—and a farmer, growing corn and beans. At this point El Niño’s still a maybe. There’s other, for-sure stuff to factor for farmers to factor in right now, he says—like the prices of seed, fuel and fertilizer. "As much as El Niño gets talked about, if they put it in their business plan, they’ll probably be less profitable," Shellady notes. 

From Shellady’s commodities-trader chair, other events are more compelling. For instance, have you heard about this disease that gives piglets diarrhea? Awful.  And it’s raising the price of pork

El Niño effects are different everywhere—more rain in California, less in India—so the effects on crops vary a lot. Commodities markets smooth out some of the bumps—but not for everyone. Purdue University economist Nelson Villoria says in some places — for instance, parts of Africa — El Niño can mean prices double for staples like rice and corn. That’s because not all countries get their food on big global markets.

"Bangladesh gets rice from India," he says. "It doesn’t matter that rice in Uruguay or Argentina is growing strongly. Bangladesh really cares about what’s happening in India."

GIF: The sea surface temperature in the equatorial Pacific Ocean.El Niño is characterized by warm temperatures, which you can see appearing in red regions:


NOAA

Here is NOAA's official description of an El Niño and La Niña: "Sea surface temperature in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (above). El Niño is characterized by unusually warm temperatures and La Niña by unusually cool temperatures in the equatorial Pacific." 

Pimps use technology, too

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 00:03

It’s hard enough measuring the mainstream economy. A new report from the Urban Institute has attempted to quantify the underground commercial sex economy. Researchers say in 2007 it was worth about $975 million, in just in seven U.S. cities.

Curious about the business expenses of pimps? Check out their online feature for further insight.

The Institute reports that pimps most often recruit sex workers from their own social circles. But the Internet is changing business. Bill Woolf is a detective with the Fairfax County Police Department in Virginia. He says most scouting and recruitment of victims by traffickers is now done online.

“Whether it’s through social media, other chat lines, through false advertisements for employment online, things of that nature,” Woolf says. “But the majority is now done online.”

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of brodcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life. Renew here or visit KBBI by April 21 to enter to win one round-trip airfare with Era between Homer and Anchorage. Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

ON THE AIR
Beggar's Banquet
Next Up: @ 12:00 am
Echoes

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4