National News

Report: Army Examines Claims Of Racial Slurs At Alaska Base

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 16:50

Army Times is reporting that members of a platoon at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, used racial slurs against one another during what they called "Racial Thursdays."

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Proposed Exxon Settlement Falls Short of Damage, N.J. Democrats Say

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 16:19

Gov. Chris Christie is defending the state's $225 billion settlement for decades of contamination at two refineries as a "good deal." But Democratic lawmakers and environmentalists say otherwise.

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Justice Ginsburg Turns Her Pen To Exodus' 'Women Of Action'

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 16:03

Famous for her legal pen, Ruth Bader Ginsburg has now written a short essay for a different reason: Passover.

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Obama To Iranians: 'Best Opportunity In Decades' For A Different Future

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 16:02

The president's message was to mark the occasion of Nowruz, the Persian new year. The U.S. and its allies are talking to Iran over the Islamic republic's nuclear program.

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In Tikrit Offensive, Local Sunnis, Shiite Militias Are Unlikely Allies

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 15:15

The main forces fighting the self-declared Islamic State in Tikrit, Iraq, are Iran-backed Iraqi Shiite militias. Despite decades-long animosity between the nations, local Sunnis are joining them.

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Women in construction: few and far between

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-03-19 15:06

As the job market heats up, employers are starting to report labor-shortages—especially of skilled workers like welders, machinists, and carpenters in manufacturing and construction.

Those jobs can pay $15/hour or more, and often offer health insurance, a pension, and on-the-job-training, especially if the worker rises through the ranks of a union apprenticeship program.

And for three decades now, Lauren Sugerman, director of the National Center for Women’s Employment Equity at Wider Opportunities for Women has been trying to get more women into well-paying construction jobs.

“The construction trades represent a significant segment of the blue-collar jobs that earn over $20/hour,” she says. “And these jobs are also growing dramatically.”

In the late 1970s, Sugerman herself entered an apprenticeship program for elevator constructors in Chicago. At the time, she says women made up less than 0.01 percent of construction workers. The percentage has gone up, but not by much, in her opinion. “Now, women are 2.6 percent of the construction workforce, so that’s very little progress.”

Sugerman says she left construction work after years struggling against discrimination and harassment on the job. It started right away. “The superintendent who interviewed me said ‘You don’t want this job, it’s too dangerous for you, girls really shouldn’t be doing this, you won’t like it.’ I just kept saying ‘Yes I do.’ And, not very different from what many women still report today, I was subjected to physical harassment, I worked around men who talked about rape in jokes.”

Sugerman became an advocate for women in the trades, working with the Chicago Women in Trades and other groups pushing for gender equality in employment. And she’s well aware of what she missed out on by leaving construction—what women today can be earning if they’re protected and well-prepared and manage to stick it out.

“‘Let’s just do the numbers,’” she quips. “I would currently be making $50/hour as an elevator constructor. Compare that to the wage in a typically female job, $9/hour as a nurse’s aide, preschool teachers are also very low on the scale. That’s a $900,000 to $2 million gap in earnings over a lifetime.”

Holly Huntley runs Environs, a small construction firm in Portland, Oregon. She’s 37 and grew up in South Carolina. She was a debutante in her teens, and started as an amateur in construction during college, helping to manage and maintain an apartment building her family owned.

“After college I just kept practicing on friends’ and families’ properties,” she says. She worked for several small construction firms, moved to Portland, and started her own company. She also teaches in a pre-apprenticeship program for Oregon Tradeswomen. Some of her current employees came through the program.

“I know a lot of women in the trades that experience harassment on a daily basis,” she says. “And what I all my female employees get from subcontractors and people making deliveries is: ‘Where’s the contractor?’ They all think that we’re the homeowner. They don’t even think that we’re working. And the odds are that I’m not the boss. The odds are that the guy on the project is the boss.”

Sajru Dueber has been studying welding at Mt. Hood Community College near Portland. Before joining the program, she taught English, dealt cards, did other jobs to support herself and her daughter. None of them, though, paid as well as a skilled trade like welding.

“I’m hoping to get involved in the train yards,” says Dueber, “do some spot welding on trains, get my foot in the door that way.” She wants to do artistic welding as well. “Ultimately I want my daughter to have the best education she can ,and that will require money, so I hope going into this field will help.”

In her welding program last year, Dueber did a report surveying women’s experience of working in welding shops. “I found a lot of females online talking about how hard it was for them to get a job, how hard it was to get accepted, how hard it was for a foreman to take them seriously,” she says. “And a lot of them were told ‘You’ll be a sexual distraction,’ or ‘Maybe you can’t pick up a box that’s forty pounds,’ or ‘You’re just a woman, I can’t take your application.’ And I’m sure that that’s something I’m going to run into.”

Remains Of Sept. 11 Victim Identified

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 14:59

New York City medical examiners used DNA testing to identify Matthew David Yarnell of New Jersey, a 26-year-old vice president of technology of the Fiduciary Trust Co.

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Watch Your Back, Kale. Kelp Is Gunning For The 'Veggie Du Jour' Title

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 14:22

With a little help, scientists say that seaweed growing along the Maine and New Hampshire coasts could become the "kale of the sea." The first step is teaching chefs and consumers how to enjoy it.

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Plant businesses have struggled since the recession

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-03-19 14:10

The heating bill can reach $30,000 for the month of January at Spring Hill Nurseries, but that is the price to be paid for green grape buds, flowering black berries, and pink hellebores — triumphant in rows ready to be shipped to the gardening public at the first hint that winter might be relenting.  

Felix Cooper, Vice President of Gardens Alive, the parent company of Spring Hill Nurseries, and greenhouse manager Jenny Lewis are giving a balmy tour through what seem like endless rows of blood-red sedum, glowing pink coral bells, and lush vining clematis. Coolers are filled with grub-like arisaema tubers, and phlox roots tumble through conveyor belts and packing machines into bags of peat moss. 

Spring Hill Nurseries has been around longer than California has been a state, and it's even older than the Washington Monument. Founded in 1848, it’s been as hardy as the goldenrod one can find on Ohio side roads. It made it through the Civil War and mechanization and everything a modern economy has thrown at it — up until now. After 166 springs, this may be it’s last. 

“It’s been a fairly steady ride down,” says Niles Kinerk, CEO of Gardens Alive. Gardens Alive owns several plant businesses and sells environmentally responsible gardening products.  

While some of its seed companies and bulb companies are doing great, Spring Hill is draining cash. A particularly nasty winter last year didn’t help. Kinerk is trying to sell it.

“The alternative for us is to cut way back,” he says.  

The demise – or dramatic scaling back – of Spring Hill Nurseries is the tail end of a nationwide phenomenon that is decades in the making but came to a head in the great recession. 

Nurseries ramped up with the housing boom, took out loans to expand, and were left holding the bag. 

“As many as 30 percent of the growers in the country exited during this period of financial stress,” says Charles Hall, an agricultural economist at Texas A&M University. “That’s a significant number of growers.”

“In previous recessions,” he says, “we had a situation where we sold more flowers, shrubs and trees because people stayed home and engaged in gardening more because they weren’t taking trips to Disneyland.”

But not this time.

Tony Avent runs Plant Delights Nursery in Raleigh, North Carolina, where the industry was especially hard hit. “North Carolina lost 40 percent of its nursery industry, including garden retailers, nurseries, the whole bit. Georgia lost sixty percent.”

The collapse is evident today in the shortage of woody ornamental plants, like landscape trees. They take five years or more to reach a sell-able size, and not many people were planting five years ago, so there aren’t enough ready now. 

There’s also new competition. 

“The big box stores have put quite a bit of effort into their green goods areas,” says Gardens Alive’s Kinerk. “They’re very competitive and they’ve taken a good hunk of business that used to be fulfilled by companies like ours.”

Credit, especially for smaller companies, is harder to come by.

“Back in 2001 the bank was willing to extend to us 10 times our earnings,” Kinerk recalls. “And now it’s down to three times earnings.” 

Federal regulations reigning in lending are partly responsible for that, and while banks have expanded small business loans as a whole, plant nurseries’ biggest source of collateral is their land.

It’s usually not worth much.

“I’ve actually had my banker say to me don’t even talk to me about the land value or building value ,” says Kinerk.   

But hovering behind the economic factors is how America’s relationship to its gardens and its plants is changing. For one, fewer people grow their own food.

“People’s size of their yards are getting smaller.  Two-income families have less time.  Gardening takes time” he says.  “It’s a great way to relax, I will hasten to add, and forget about your day!”

Kinerk still has faith that Spring Hill can flourish again, but he can’t be the one to rescue it. He needs to use his cash to invest in his businesses that are growing.

“They’re good businesses, and if we could find a buyer who had the cash to invest to get it going like it could again, it’d be better for everyone .”

The plant nursery industry will not disappear, its roots are too deep for that, but for now it is smaller and a bit wilted. 

Australia Takes Over Local Government On Tiny Bankrupt Island

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 14:05

Norfolk island, home to descendants of sailors who mutinied on the HMS Bounty in 1789, will be administered from Canberra beginning next year.

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Obama To Prince Charles: We'll Never Be Royals

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 13:15

President Obama told the Prince that Americans like the royal family "much better than they like their own politicians." He may be right.

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Chanel Handbags Prices To Rise In Europe, Lower In Asia

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 13:06

Chanel says it is aligning the cost of its handbags worldwide. The move reacts to the depreciating Euro, and aims to stop people from buying up the classic bags to sell at a profit in other countries.

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Why Russia's Economic Slump Has Been Good For London

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 12:55

Britain's financial community was worried last year when the West began imposing sanctions on Russia. But it turns out that only encouraged wealthy Russians to pump more money into Britain.

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Egyptian Singer, Meet Burundi Bassist. Play Among Yourselves!

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 12:44

The musicians who live in countries along the Nile rarely got to meet — until the Nile Project came along. Now they learn from each other, make records together and are currently touring the U.S.

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Despite Cease-Fire, Skirmishes Carry On Along Ukraine's Front Line

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 12:36

Ukrainian forces and pro-Russia separatists are still exchanging fire and inflicting casualties at hot spots in eastern Ukraine. The separatists haven't withdrawn heavy weapons, Ukrainians say.

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Target Agrees To $10 Million Settlement Over Data Breach

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 12:23

Court documents show victims of the 2013 hack could get as much as $10,000 apiece.

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Are pro sports teams economic winners for cities?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-03-19 12:19

There are a lot of things economists disagree about, but the economic impact of sports stadiums isn't one of them.

“If you ever had a consensus in economics, this would be it," says Michael Leeds, a sports economist at Temple University.  "There is no impact."

Leeds studied Chicago – as big a sports town as there is, with five major teams.

“If every sports team in Chicago were to suddenly disappear, the impact on the Chicago economy would be a fraction of 1 percent,” Leeds says. “A baseball team has about the same impact on a community as a midsize department store.”

That’s for a sport with 80 home games a year. NFL teams only play eight regular season games. Still, politicians love building sports stadiums.

“Yes, we will have the NFL back in Los Angeles!” shouted Carson City Councilwoman Lula Davis-Holmes at a rally last month, celebrating plans for a new stadium housing the Chargers and Raiders that would be built in this small city 15 miles south of downtown.

“Stand to your feet and say we want the teams here, for jobs, for revenue, and for our young people,” Holmes said.

Down the freeway, next to Los Angeles International Airport, Inglewood is trying to stay one step ahead of Carson. So last month, its City Council approved plans to build the most expensive stadium in U.S. sports history.

Inglewood – one of poorest neighborhoods in LA — projects a football stadium would generate more than $800 million dollars worth of economic activity a year. 

But Victor Matheson, a sports economist at College of the Holy Cross, is dubious.

“A good rule of thumb that economists use is to take what stadium boosters are telling you and move that one decimal place to the left, and that’s usually a good estimate of what you’re going to get,” Matheson says.

Economists say the biggest reason sports teams don’t have much impact is that they don’t tend to spur new spending.  Most people have a limited entertainment budget, so the dollars they are spending when they go to a game is money they would have spent elsewhere, maybe even at a restaurant or small businesses where more money would have stayed in the community. Plus, Matheson says, rather than draw people to a neighborhood, games can actually repel them.

“Sporting events can cause significant crowds and congestion that can cause people to stop going to other events in the area,” he says.

That’s part of the reason why a 2003 analysis on Staples Center commissioned by the Los Angeles City Controller included a surprising finding.

“Economic activity in Inglewood actually increased when the Lakers left town,” says Matheson.

That is, sales tax revenue went up when the Lakers and Kings moved to Staples Center in 1999.

Chris Meany, who’s leading development of the Inglewood stadium site, strongly disagrees that Inglewood benefited from the Kings and Lakers leaving.

“To argue that Inglewood is better off because downtown L.A. took the Lakers and Kings is to stretch credulity,” says Meany.

Inglewood's mayor, James Butts, says even if the economic impact isn’t as good as advertised, building a stadium poses a win/win for taxpayers.

“There’s a lot of numbers floated about but whatever the numbers are, here’s the bottom line: The city is protected,” says Butts. “In every stadium deal you look at before this one the risk is borne by the city. In this case, the risk is borne by the developers.”

That’s not true in Missouri, where politicians are desperately trying to keep the Rams from moving to Inglewood.  Governor Jay Nixon announced a plan that would give the team $400 million to stay. 

Because as politically popular as it can be to attract a team, it’s seen as political suicide to let one get away.

Judge Rejects Release Of Grand Jury Testimony In Eric Garner Case

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 11:45

Garner died last July after being placed in a chokehold as he was being arrested for selling loose cigarettes on the sidewalk. A grand jury decided not to indict the officer involved in the death.

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'Looks Like Laury' Shines The Power Of Friendship On A Failing Mind

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 11:29

When actress and writer Laury Sacks started losing words fast, her best friends, who happened to be filmmakers, captured her experience. Looks Like Laury, Sounds Like Laury shows how they reached her.

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Netanyahu Says A Palestinian State Is 'Unachievable' Today

NPR News - Thu, 2015-03-19 11:20

Israel's prime minister tells NPR he doesn't want a "zero-state solution" that will jeopardize Israel's existence. Separately, Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat accuses Netanyahu of "exporting fear."

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