National News

Sloppy Splinting Can Make A Child's Broken Arm Much Worse

NPR News - Fri, 2014-10-10 10:08

A pediatrician who specializes in fixing broken bones in kids and teens says about 90 percent of the fractures he treats have been splinted improperly in a community ER or urgent care center first.

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Oregon First Lady Sorry For 'Marriage Of Convenience' With Green Card Seeker

NPR News - Fri, 2014-10-10 09:58

In 1997, Cylvia Hayes received money to marry an Ethiopian who wanted a green card. Her fiance, Democratic Gov. John Kitzhaber, is seeking a fourth term. She says he didn't know of the marriage.

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Turkey Agrees To Train, Equip Moderate Syrian Opposition

NPR News - Fri, 2014-10-10 09:36

The pledge to create a force to assist in fighting the self-declared Islamic State comes a day after Ankara called for creating a buffer zone around its border with Syria.

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32 Myths About The Flu Vaccine You Don't Need To Fear

NPR News - Fri, 2014-10-10 08:41

Vaccination isn't a perfect defense against flu. But vaccines remain the most reliable way to reduce the risk from an illness that causes thousands of deaths in the U.S. during a typical flu season.

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The numbers for October 10, 2014

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-10-10 08:32

A military analyst at American University has revised his estimated price for the U.S.-led fight against ISIS to $40 billion per year. That's double Gordon Adam's original estimates, and he attributes the increase to unforeseen resilience from the extremist group, and a need to bolster U.S. allies in the region.

As we wait for a more official number from the Pentagon, here are the other stories we're reading and numbers we're watching Friday.

17

The age of human rights and education advocate Malala Yousafzai, who was learned she she is the youngest-ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize at school Friday, the BBC reported. Yousafzai survived being shot in the head by a Taliban assassin in 2012 after campaigning for girls' education in Pakistan's Swat Valley. She will share the award with Indian children rights activist Kailash Satyarthi.

20 million

That's how many people shop at the Macy's flagship store in midtown Manhattan each year. Amazon will open its very first brick-and-mortar store just down the street, the Wall Street Journal reported. Little is known about the store, but it will reportedly serve as a hub for pick-ups and returns, while eventually selling Amazon devices, like the Kindle and Fire smartphone.

$10,000

That's how much the NFL is fining San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick for wearing his Beats by Dre headphones to a press conference last weekend. The league has an exclusive sponsorship deal with Bose, ESPN reported. Kaepernick, who has an endorsement deal with Beats, wouldn't say if the company will reimburse him for the fine.

What percentage of SAT test-takers met the College Board’s readiness benchmark in 2014?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-10-10 08:16

Thinking about college, but not prepared to go More kids than ever are taking the SAT, but lots aren’t ready for what comes next.

More than 1.6 million students took the SAT in 2014, yet the percentage of those deemed ready for college and career hasn’t budged in years.

What percentage of SAT test-takers met the College Board’s readiness benchmark in 2014?

Ebola Joke Triggers Passenger's Removal From US Airways Flight

NPR News - Fri, 2014-10-10 06:58

The passenger, who was taken off a flight after it landed in the Dominican Republic, reportedly coughed and then said: "I have Ebola. You're all screwed."

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PODCAST: Taking a mental health day

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-10-10 03:00

First up, more on the key indexes were mixed in early trading today following the awful performance of Thursday. Until recently, market participants looked at the stronger dollar buying more oil, pushing the price of energy down and figured these were good things for profits and household budgets. Suddenly, sentiment turns, and the strong dollar and cheap oil are bad things because they underscore the weakness of economies from Europe to Asia. Plus, it's World Mental Health Day, so we thought it would be a useful moment to check in on mental health in the workplace. The CDC estimates that depression alone can cause 200 million lost workdays, costing companies as much as $44 billion every year. And on Sunday, Bolivians go to the polls to vote for president. Evo Morales, is running for a third term and is the favorite to win. In the past decade, Bolivia's been praised for cutting poverty, but it still remains one of the poorest countries in the hemisphere. Morales is Boliva's first president of indigenous heritage and a pillar of his leadership has been to improve the lives of indigenous communities, which are a majority.

Silicon Tally: Death, Sext, and Digital Money

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-10-10 02:00

It's time for Silicon Tally! How well have you kept up with the week in tech news?

This week, we're joined by Anna Sale, host of WNYC's "Death, Sex & Money," a podcast about the big questions and hard choices that are often left out of polite conversation.

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How companies help workers with their mental health

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-10-10 02:00

It’s World Mental Health Day, a good opportunity to check in on mental health in the workplace. The CDC estimates that depression alone can cause 200 million lost workdays annually, costing companies as much as $44 billion every year.

Does that motivate employers to offer more mental health benefits? A 2014 survey from the American Psychological Association found just 45 percent of employees say they get help from employers to meet their mental health needs. But the APA’s Dr. David Ballard—who works with businesses closely—says company attitudes are changing.

“I think we’ve shifted from a lack of awareness and a lack of understanding to a desire to address it, but not always knowing how to do that,” he says

Case in point, Ballard points to the small Wooster, Ohio, company Certified Angus Beef, which may be on the cutting edge of mental health wellness.

Once a month, the firm brings in a clinical psychologist that staff can see on company time. On top of that, Certified Angus Beef offers employees and their family members up to three free visits a year.

“When we really looked at what people struggle with is all the stress, all the life stress,” says the company's director of human resources, Pam Cottrell. She says in three years, utilization of services has tripled.

Ballard says what he likes about the Certified Angus Beef’s approach is that it’s easy, and affordable. The company spends less than $10,000 a year on the benefit.

A new designation for the San Gabriel Mountains

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-10-10 02:00

On Friday, President Barack Obama will declare 346,000 acres of forestland just north of Los Angeles as a national monument. 

Supporters hope the move will free up both federal and private money that they say is needed to take better care of the San Gabriel Mountains forest area, a popular recreation destination with millions of visitors a year.

"This national forest is one of the most visited places in the country,” says Daniel Rossman, who as chair of the group San Gabriel Mountains Forever has been working for more than a decade to get more resources for the forestland. 

Some who live near the forest have not wanted a monument designation, because they are concerned that it will come with restrictions, such as limits on land use. 

But Rossman says the designation is necessary, because the Forest Service has had trouble keeping up with all the trash and pollution that comes with so many visitors. 

"I’ve personally done clean-ups, picking up dirty diapers and old pieces of clothing,” Rossman says, adding that the mountains are responsible for 30 percent of the Los Angeles region’s water supply. 

California Congresswoman Judy Chu says the president’s executive action will circumvent the current gridlock in Congress.

The monument designation will not only bring more personnel and federal money to the forest, it will also allow for private fundraising, says Chu. 

“You can have a private-public partnership. And already we have non-profit and private donations that have been pledged,” Chu says. 

The Forest Service will be able to set the privately-raised money aside for the San Gabriel Mountains monument; Something it couldn’t do for a national forest. 

 

 

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Judy Chu had been working on Congressional legislation for more than 10 years. Though she supports the change, she has not been advocating for it for that long.

 

Supreme Court Halts Wisconsin Voter ID Law; Texas Law Overturned

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 19:15

After an appeals court put Wisconsin's law back into effect, the Supreme Court's liberal wing, plus Justices Kennedy and Roberts, voted put the law on hold while they decide whether to take the case.

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Microsoft CEO Backtracks On Suggestion That Women Shouldn't Ask For Raises

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 16:52

During a talk at a conference about women in technology, Satya Nadella said those women who don't ask for raises would be compensated by "karma."

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Jan Hooks, Best Known For Her Roles On SNL, Dies At Age 57

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 16:16

Hooks was a cast member on Saturday Night Live from 1986 to 1991, playing key characters like Hillary Clinton and Sinead O'Connor.

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Report: Amazon To Open Brick-And-Mortar Store

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 14:46

The Wall Street Journal reports the online retailer's store will also serve as a mini-warehouse that could provide same-day delivery the New York region.

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Ebola: Does The Risk Justify The Intensity Of Coverage?

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 13:55

A series of developments over the past 24 hours have made one Ebola case feel like an epidemic. But the truth is the risk of Ebola spreading in the United States is the same it's been for months.

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Millennials Are Blue Now, But Party Allegiance Could Be Up For Grabs

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 13:25

They're not the Obama-adoring college students of 2008 anymore. They're the generation hard-hit by the economy.

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Three Forlorn Presidents Bring Ebola Wish List To The World Bank

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 13:16

The leaders of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone pleaded for help at the annual World Bank-IMF meeting: "This slower-than-the-virus response needs to change."

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Export-Import Bank reports $675 million earnings

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-10-09 12:38

The Export-Import Bank, also known as the Ex-Im Bank, announced today that it returned $675 million to the Treasury Department. Because it's a government agency, it's technically not a profit. 

So what is this government-run bank, exactly?

"We exist solely to help support U.S. jobs when U.S. companies are selling overseas," said Ex-Im chair Fred Hochberg in an interview with Kai Ryssdal.

That support comes in the form of loans to businesses large and small, which drew Congressional scrutiny this year. Republicans called Ex-Im Bank loans a subsidy on outsourcing U.S. jobs. Plus, they said, the bank is unnecessary in light of private sector funds for exporters.

While 98 percent of exporters seek private financing, Hochberg insists that the Ex-Im Bank has a role to play for those that remain. 

"We're Plan B," Hochberg said, adding, "We fill a gap when private sector is unable, unwilling, or market conditions are just too risky for them."

Even Boeing uses the Ex-Im Bank. Supporters say this is to keep up with similar export banks in other countries that would otherwise have a big competitive advantage. So while Boeing could easily survive without the Ex-Im, it makes keeping up with the Joneses (in this case, Airbus), that much easier. 

As for how much it can spend on loans, Congress sets a budget for the bank, but doesn't allocate extra money for its operation. The bank is self-supported, from a portion of its earnings, like those announced today. Hochberg stressed this was another reason why the bank should be seen in an apolitical light.

"There are no Democratic jobs, there are no Republican jobs. There are jobs in every state that are dependent on exports." 

 

Listen to the full conversation in the audio player above.

Gangs Can't Stop Colombia's Butterflies From Rescuing Women In Need

NPR News - Thu, 2014-10-09 12:24

By bus, by bike and by foot, they come to the aid of abused and displaced women in Colombia. And they've just won a $100,000 humanitarian prize for their efforts.

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