National News

In The Hospital, There's No Such Thing As A Lesbian Knee

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:06

People in the LGBT community often have a hard time getting appropriate health care. But the problems aren't unique to them. Doesn't everyone want to have a doctor call them by their preferred name?

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The 3-Bird Turducken Has Nothing On This 17-Bird Royal Roast

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 07:45

The Frenchman who was the world's first restaurant critic launched the world's first serial food journal in 1803. To wow readers, he offered a recipe for for rôti sans pareil, the roast without equal.

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Ex-News Of The World Editor Andy Coulson Freed From Prison

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 07:31

Coulson, who was found guilty of conspiracy to hack personal voicemails, was released today after serving less than five months of his 18-month sentence.

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Republicans File Suit Against Obama Administration Over Health Law

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:54

House Republicans have been threatening to sue Obama over executive actions he's taken on the Affordable Care Act. Today, they pulled the trigger.

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Speaker Boehner Says The House Will Act On Immigration

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:53

Republican Rep. John Boehner delivered a statement Friday in reaction to President Obama's immigration address, saying Obama is damaging the presidency.

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What's with the addiction to subscription boxes?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:49

The DIY movement notwithstanding, many people are so desperate to shed chores they’ve started outsourcing even frivolous shopping. It’s a situation caused by and, in turn, fueling a big retail trend: subscription boxes.

Even if you think you’ve never heard of subscription boxes, you probably have. Years ago, we knew them as the fruit- or cheese-of-the month club. Now they’ve gone upscale, niche – and run amok. 

There are subscription boxes for vegans and carnivores, for the gluten-free and gluten loaders, for people who can’t get enough ostrich jerky or infinity scarves, for preschoolers who insist on sustainably sourced toys – maybe as many as 500.

At this point in the game – about four years since the launch of Birchbox, the beauty-sample site credited with starting the recent surge – almost any American, and her finicky pet, could survive on boxes alone.

Somehow, a nation that endlessly whines about household clutter, and is so prickly about presents that there’s a registry for every gift-giving event, has started paying strangers to pick out — excuse me, curate — random items and ship said items to their homes.

And on those glum days when the mailbox is empty, junkies can fill the void with box-centric YouTube videos, blogs, reviews and discussion boards.

One theory to explain the phenomenon is that we have too much choice – it’s a relief to let someone else paw through all of the junk for you.  Another is that exhausted working women want a gift every month – even if it’s one they’ve sent, and paid for, themselves. Even if they don’t actually like it.

 Oh, really, I shouldn’t have . . .

Subscribers take their deliveries so seriously that blogs warn of “spoilers” before discussing the contents of a particular box. It’s like learning the gender of your unborn baby, only the reveal involves small-batch pistachios.

Recently, I flirted with a fashion box but luckily the realization that I’d end up schlepping to return clothes I didn’t choose in the first place kicked in before I'd entered my credit card.

But there is one box I’d love: a subscription that takes a box of stuff from your house every month. Call it the disappearing box.

The subscription box that should be

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:49

The DIY movement notwithstanding, many people are so desperate to shed chores they’ve started outsourcing even frivolous shopping. It’s a situation caused by and, in turn, fueling a big retail trend: subscription boxes.

Even if you think you’ve never heard of subscription boxes, you probably have. Years ago we knew them as the fruit- or cheese-of-the month club. Now they’ve gone upscale, niche — and run amok. 

There are subscription boxes for vegans and carnivores, for the gluten-free and gluten loaders, for people who can’t get enough ostrich jerky or infinity scarves, for preschoolers who insist on sustainably-sourced toys—maybe as many as 500.

At this point in the game — about four years since the launch of Birchbox, the beauty-sample site credited with starting the recent surge — almost any American, and her finicky pet, could survive on boxes alone.

Somehow, a nation that endlessly whines about household clutter, and is so prickly about presents that there’s a registry for every gift-giving event, has started paying strangers to pick out — excuse me, curate — random items and ship said items to their homes.

And on those glum days when the mailbox is empty, junkies can fill the void with box-centric YouTube videos, blogs, reviews, and discussion boards.

One theory to explain the phenomenon is that we have too much choice--it’s a relief to let someone else paw through all of the junk for you.  Another is that exhausted working women want a gift every month — even if it’s one they’ve sent, and paid for, themselves. Even if they don’t actually like it.

Oh, really, I shouldn’t have . . .

Subscribers take their deliveries so seriously that blogs warn of “spoilers” before discussing the contents of a particular box. It’s like learning the gender of your unborn baby, only the reveal involves small-batch pistachios.

Recently I flirted with a fashion box, but luckily the realization that I’d end up schlepping to return clothes I didn’t choose in the first place kicked in before I’d entered my credit card.

But there is one box I’d love: a subscription that takes a box of stuff from your house every month. Call it the disappearing box.

London Mayor Boris Johnson Owes IRS Money, Won't Pay

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:42

Johnson holds dual U.S.-U.K. citizenship, but hasn't lived in the U.S. since he was 5. He told WAMU's Diane Rehm Show that he had been billed for capital gains on the sale of his first home.

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Student data and school attendance

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:35

Schools are gathering data on kids, and as student databases grow, so does the ability of technology to predict how or what a kid might do next.

Marketplace's Adriene Hill has been looking at the ways student data is being used to see into the future, and spoke with David Brancaccio to talk about efforts to predict, and change, attendance patterns.

The 2 Things That Rarely Happen After a Medical Mistake

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:13

When patients are harmed by a medical error, they rarely are told about it or given an apology, according to a study based on results from ProPublica's Patient Harm Questionnaire.

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Holder Calls For Calm As Ferguson Grand Jury Decision Looms

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 06:02

In a newly released video, Holder has messages for law enforcement agents as well as for those protesting the police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

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Boehner: 'We Will Not Stand Idly By As President Undermines The Rule Of Law'

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 05:26

House Speaker John Boehner said President Obama acted like a king when he deferred the deportation of up to 5 million immigrants.

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Quiz: Have you seen your kid’s data?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 04:36

A majority of states gather data on students over time in longitudinal databases, according to the Data Quality Campaign, but not all of them guarantee parents access to that information.

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Aereo files for Chapter 11 reorganization

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 04:15

On Friday, the beleaguered television-streaming service Aereo announced it would file for Chapter 11 reorganization. Founder and CEO Chet Kanojia wrote in a blog post that doing so would, "permit Aereo to maximize the value of its business and assets without the extensive cost and distraction of defending drawn out litigation in several courts."

It's been a long journey since the cloud-based television streaming company got started three years ago—Aereo's promise to change the way we watched television was immediately met by a lawsuit brought on by major TV networks.

Aereo celebrated some victories: this year, when ABC's live-stream of the Oscars failed where Aereo's succeeded. But ultimately, a 6-3 vote from the Supreme Court found that the company violated federal copyright law by retransmitting copyrighted programs without paying a fee. In other words, the court didn't buy Aereo's technological argument.

The company was considered a favorite among cord cutters—people who favor streaming services over cable—and there's been a rise in networks jumping on the streaming bandwagon since Aereo lost in the high court. And in the wake of the Supreme Court's decision, there have even been companies looking to take Aereo's place.

 

Who's Dreaming Now? Obama Opponents Do A Weapons Check On Immigration

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 03:55

At the Republican Governors Association meeting in Florida, 2016 presidential contenders vied to be the most outraged. But here too, the focus was less on the policy than on the unilateral process.

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Still Reeling From SCOTUS Decision, Aereo Files For Bankruptcy

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 03:37

The streaming company's founder said fallout from a Supreme Court ruling in favor of TV networks proved "too difficult to overcome."

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Gauging the crush of college debt, major by major

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 03:00
11

Beleaguered TV-streaming company Aereo announced Friday it would file for Chapter 11 reorganization. When asked about his company's lasting impact, CEO and founder of Aereo Chet Kenojia said: “I think we struck a chord in a lot of people’s hearts that there was something arcane about how television was distributed and watched.”

25 percent

That's the portion of earnings college graduates typically devote to paying off student loans in their first year out of school. That number comes from the Hamilton Project, which has just released new data on income and loan payments in the years after college. They found different fields see very different paths to repayment. The New York Times' Upshot is hosting their new debt calculator.

2 hours

That's the window Comcast gives customers waiting for a visit from a technician, though it's not clear how consistently they arrive in that timeframe. The company says their new app, expected out next year, will alert subscribers when service is 30 minutes away. The Verge notes the company might have bigger problems though, as reported in the four-part "Comcast Confessions" series.

25 percent

The portion of the world's sapphire Apple uses in its iPhone screens and camera lenses. The company build a $1 billion facility in Arizona for supplier GT Advanced Technologies to produce the material. But GT completely imploded not long after, finally filing for bankruptcy last month.  The Wall Street Journal takes a deep dive into just what went wrong, and the "promise and peril" of supplying iPhone parts.

6 percent

Research shows that granting legal status to immigrants increases wages by 6 percent, creating spillover benefits for many. That's especially good news for cities like Detroit, where immigration is viewed as one of the few tools available to bring the city's economy back from the brink.

Gauging the crush college debt according to major

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 03:00
11

Beleaguered TV-streaming company Aereo announced Friday it would file for Chapter 11 reorganization. When asked about his company's lasting impact, CEO and founder of Aereo Chet Kenojia said “I think we struck a chord in a lot of people’s hearts that there was something arcane about how television was distributed and watched.”

25 percent

That's the portion of earnings college graduates typically devote to paying off student loans in their first year out of school. That number comes from the Hamilton Project, which has just released new data on income and loan payments in the years after college. They found different fields see very different paths to repayment. The New York Times' Upshot is hosting their new debt calculator.

2 hours

That's the window Comcast gives customers waiting for a visit from a technician, though it's not clear how consistently they arrive in that timeframe. The company says their new app, expected out next year, will alert subscribers when service is 30 minutes away. The Verge notes the company might have bigger problems though, as reported in the four-part "Comcast Confessions" series.

25 percent

The portion of the world's sapphire Apple uses in its iPhone screens and camera lenses. The company build a $1 billion facility in Arizona for supplier GT Advanced Technologies to produce the material. But GT completely imploded not long after, finally filing for bankruptcy last month.  The Wall Street Journal takes a deep dive into just what went wrong, and the "promise and peril" of supplying iPhone parts.

6 percent

Research shows that granting legal status to immigrants increases wages by 6 percent, creating spillover benefits for many. That's especially good news for cities like Detroit, where immigration is viewed as one of the few tools available to bring the city's economy back from the brink.

PODCAST: Predicting truancy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 03:00

First up, China's central bank this morning surprised market players by dropped two key interest rates to stimulate the economy. More on that. Plus, student loan debt has topped $1 trillion, with less than 10 percent in private debt, i.e. not through the federal government. Those private lenders have been pressured to work with struggling borrowers to modify the terms of their loans. Now, it seems Wells Fargo has heard that message. And speaking of students, schools are gathering data on kids, and as student databases grow, so does the ability of technology to predict how or what a kid might do next. We take a look at the ways student data is being used to try to see into the future to predict, and change, school attendance . 

U.S. Transfers 5 Guantanamo Detainees To Georgia, Slovakia

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 02:36

Four of them become the first Yemeni detainees to be transferred since 2010. There are still 143 men at the American prison in Guantanamo.

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