National News

Expected Flow Of Bulgarians, Romanians Raises Hackles In Europe

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 09:46

On Jan. 1, workers from the two countries became free to move across the EU in search of jobs. But the prospect of new workers from two of the bloc's newest and poorest members has prompted fears of "poverty migrants" – especially in Britain and Germany.

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Warring South Sudan Factions Arrive In Ethiopia For Peace Talks

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 09:13

The talks in Ethiopia will focus on a cease-fire, as well as political prisoners and the 2015 presidential elections. But the fighting in the world's newest country continued even as delegates gathered.

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Michael Schumacher Remains In Coma On Eve Of 45th Birthday

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:54

The race car legend fell while skiing in France on Sunday. A blow to his head caused extensive bleeding in his brain. Doctors induced a coma and have operated twice. They aren't talking publicly about his chances for recovery.

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New Year's resolution: Don't get hacked

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:07

For some tech companies, hopes to not get hacked in 2014 have already been dashed.

Self-destructing messaging app Snapchat is on the defensive this week. 4.6 million user names -- and their associated phone numbers -- were leaked in a security breach. And Microsoft calling service Skype has become the latest victim of the hacking unit calling itself the Syrian Electronic Army. That's after the S.E.A. apparently hacked into Skype's Twitter and Facebook accounts and started broadcasting messages telling people not to use Microsoft because the company sells data to governments. The BBC's Dave Lee joins us to help explain.

Click the audio player above to hear more.

Moved By Emotion: This Story Changed A Photographer's Lens

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:56

Kristie McLean traveled to Ethiopia to photograph women with obstetric fistula, a hole formed between the birth canal and bladder or rectum during labor. The terrible injury results in incontinence, and rejection by society. One story affected McLean more than any other; later, she learned its power was in its telling.

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After rescue, a question: Who owns Antarctica?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33

Down in Antarctica, those researchers trapped in the ice are finally on their way home.

The rescue operation was an international one. A Chinese helicopter shuttled stranded researchers from the Russian ship to an Australian icebreaker.

International cooperation is sort of the theme in Antarctica; a place for science, not business. But considering its untapped natural resources, can Antarctica remain unpolluted by economic interests?

For a long time, there’s been speculation about the natural resources buried under Antarctica. It remains only speculation for a good reason.

“At the South Pole, the ice is over 9,000 feet thick. So even getting down to terra firma to find out whether or not there were minerals or resources there would be very difficult,” says Frank Klotz, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Klotz says the U.S. should keep a presence in Antarctica in order to maintain influence over how the continent is governed.

Under an international treaty, Antarctica is kept as an icy lab for scientists.

Ohio State University geologist Berry Lyons is headed to Antarctica next week.

“The international cooperation is probably unique. And a really good model for international cooperation,” says Lyons.

But that international model cuts both ways. For example, the governing body in Antarctica works on consensus.

“Their version of consensus is that everyone unanimously has to agree to a proposal in order for it to move forward,” says Andrea Kavanagh, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Southern Ocean sanctuaries project.

She’s been working to extend protections for the marine life around Antarctica because fishing boats are finding their local waters are all fished-out.

“And that’s why Antarctica has become a great, new, lucrative fishing ground,” says Kavanagh.

The big prize in those waters is Chilean sea bass. Because of its high price per pound, fishermen call it ‘white gold.’

Instead of cooperation, there’s international competition to net the Antarctic fish.

Who owns Antarctica?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33

Down in Antarctica, those researchers trapped in the ice are finally on their way home.

The rescue operation was an international one. A Chinese helicopter shuttled stranded researchers from the Russian ship to an Australian icebreaker.

International cooperation is sort of the theme in Antarctica; a place for science, not business. But considering its untapped natural resources, can Antarctica remain unpolluted by economic interests?

For a long time, there’s been speculation about the natural resources buried under Antarctica. It remains only speculation for a good reason.

“At the South Pole, the ice is over 9,000 feet thick. So even getting down to terra firma to find out whether or not there were minerals or resources there would be very difficult,” says Frank Klotz, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Klotz says the U.S. should keep a presence in Antarctica in order to maintain influence over how the continent is governed.

Under an international treaty, Antarctica is kept as an icy lab for scientists.

Ohio State University geologist Berry Lyons is headed to Antarctica next week.

“The international cooperation is probably unique. And a really good model for international cooperation,” says Lyons.

But that international model cuts both ways. For example, the governing body in Antarctica works on consensus.

“Their version of consensus is that everyone unanimously has to agree to a proposal in order for it to move forward,” says Andrea Kavanagh, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Southern Ocean sanctuaries project.

She’s been working to extend protections for the marine life around Antarctica because fishing boats are finding their local waters are all fished-out.

“And that’s why Antarctica has become a great, new, lucrative fishing ground,” says Kavanagh.

The big prize in those waters is Chilean sea bass. Because of its high price per pound, fishermen call it ‘white gold.’

Instead of cooperation, there’s international competition to net the Antarctic fish.

Juanita Moore, Groundbreaking Actress, Dies

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:58

Her role as Annie Johnson in the 1959 film Imitation of Life led to an Oscar nomination — just the fifth at that time for a black actor or actress. Moore was 99 when she died on Wednesday.

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PODCAST: Fiat buys the rest of Chrysler

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:39

The FT100 in London is down about a tenth percent on this first day of trading in 2014. Dow, S&P and Nasdaq futures are all down. The number of people signing up for unemployment benefits dipped slightly in the last week, a hint that the job market is holding steady.

The Italian carmaker Fiat has reached a deal to buy the rest of American automaker Chrysler, something it has wanted to do for years. Fiat hopes the deal will make it easier for them to compete with companies like Toyota and Volkswagen. Perhaps more importantly, Fiat desperately needs some of Chrysler’s cash.

And, foreclosures are way down from the worst of the housing crisis. But as we start this new year, don’t be surprised if some places see a rise in foreclosure sales. That’s because foreclosures that have been slowly working their way through judicial pipelines are now coming to market. That may prove a rude awakening in some areas.

Accident Or Not? Palestinian Diplomat's Death Is A Mystery

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:20

The Palestinian ambassador to the Czech Republic was killed Wednesday by an explosion at his home in Prague. At first, officials said he may have triggered a bomb meant to explode only if a safe was tampered with. But other officials are disputing that account.

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Fiat hopes Chrysler deal will help it compete with VW, Toyota

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:07

The Italian carmaker Fiat has reached a deal to buy the rest of American automaker Chrysler, something it has wanted to do for years.

“The main reason is it will allow them to fully integrate as one company,” says Michelle Krebs, senior analyst with Edmunds.com.

Fiat hopes the deal will make it easier for them to compete with companies like Toyota and Volkswagen. Perhaps more importantly, Fiat desperately needs some of Chrysler’s cash.

According to analyst Dave Sullivan, with AutoPacific, Europe’s anemic economy hasn’t been good for auto sales.

“Chrysler is really helping to keep Fiat afloat during these difficult times,” he says.

Fiat’s relationship with Chrysler goes back to 2009, when Chrysler was in bankruptcy.

“I mean, you could say that Fiat was basically gifted a stake in Chrysler,” Sullivan says.

The rest of the company went to the UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust, which had considered an IPO to sell its shares.

With this agreement, that won’t happen. The UAW will sell its ownership stake in a deal valued at more than $4 billion.

Fiat reaches deal to buy rest of Chrysler

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:07

The Italian carmaker Fiat has reached a deal to buy the rest of American automaker Chrysler, something it has wanted to do for years.

“The main reason is it will allow them to fully integrate as one company,” says Michelle Krebs, senior analyst with Edmunds.com.

Fiat hopes the deal will make it easier for them to compete with companies like Toyota and Volkswagen. Perhaps more importantly, Fiat desperately needs some of Chrysler’s cash.

According to analyst Dave Sullivan, with AutoPacific, Europe’s anemic economy hasn’t been good for auto sales.

“Chrysler is really helping to keep Fiat afloat during these difficult times,” he says.

Fiat’s relationship with Chrysler goes back to 2009, when Chrysler was in bankruptcy.

“I mean, you could say that Fiat was basically gifted a stake in Chrysler,” Sullivan says.

The rest of the company went to the UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust, which had considered an IPO to sell its shares.

With this agreement, that won’t happen. The UAW will sell its ownership stake in a deal valued at more than $4 billion.

Jobless Claims Were Nearly Unchanged Last Week

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 05:47

But the fact that 339,000 applications were filed — the fewest in a month — is a hopeful sign. Meanwhile, the most-anticipated news about the labor market each month, on the unemployment rate and job growth, won't be released until Jan. 10.

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Challenging new GED exams go all digital

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 05:35

Starting today, people who take the high school equivalency exam will face a test that's supposedly tougher and will only be offered via computer, no more paper and number two pencil. The test was created in 1942 at first to help military veterans get higher education without forcing them to return to high school after the experience of war. Emily Hanford, Education Correspondent for our documentary unit, American Radio Works, joins us to help explain.

Stocks in 2013: All sugar rush, no substance?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 04:58

The S&P 500 went up 29 percent in the year gone by. The Nasdaq Composite rose nearly 40 percent. But this has prompted an argument that stock prices in 2013 were like cotton candy, lots of size, but not a lot of substance. Marketplace's Economics guy Chris Farrell has been considering this.

The argument comes down to the idea that the gains of 2013 reflected more of the Fed's quantitative easing rather than any real economic improvement, and that prices are bound to come tumbling back down sooner or later. But does the claim that the stock markets' gains have no substance, hold up?

Click the audio player above to hear more.

100 Million People In Path Of 2014's First Wintry Blast

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 04:35

Parts of the Northeast and New England are expected to be hit the hardest today and Friday. More than a foot of snow may fall on Boston. The wind chill may plunge to 40 degrees below zero in the Adirondacks. Flight delays and cancellations are piling up along with the snow.

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TV news paywalls are coming

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 04:01

Never paid for local TV news?  Well, that may be changing.  Cincinnati’s  WCPO-TV is going to offer local investigative stories behind a paywall.  It’s added 30 digital staffers.

“What they’re saying is, don’t think of us as TV, think of us as your best local digital news source,” says Ken Doctor, a media consultant.

The way WCPO-TV sees it, it’s go digital and dominate -- or die.  Adam Symson, who is chief digital officer for the station's owner, E.W. Scripps, says Cincinnati’s many TV and radio stations won’t all survive.  Symson is hoping a beefed up web presence will ensure market dominance.

“This is not just an investment in growing a digital audience,” he says. “This is an investment in the brand, WCPO, the television ratings and the digital audience.”

The question is, will people pay for something they’re used to getting for free? Other TV stations are watching WCPO’s web experiment closely, to find out.  

Apps to help keep your New Year's resolutions

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 03:35

Today is the second day of the new year and if you haven't started with major life changes you are already a day behind schedule. You might be hoping to get some help from apps. Whitson Gordon, editor in chief of Lifehacker, joins us to offer some advice.

Click play on the audio player above to hear more.

VIDEO: Stranded Passengers Flown To Safety In Antarctic

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 03:35

The 52 scientists and paying passengers aboard the MV Akademik Shokalskiy had been stranded by ice since Christmas Eve. They've been flown by helicopter to an Australian ship in open waters. The 22 crew members of the Akademik Shokalskiy are staying behind. It's hoped the ship will soon break free.

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Tech predictions for 2014: Software and startups

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 03:08

All this week we've been talking to people about their predictions for tech in 2014. Today we hear from Dave McClure, founding partner at the Venture Capitol firm 500 Startups. McClure traveled all over the world last year. We asked him what kind of software everyone everyone will be using this year. He says expect more growth in messaging apps around the world. Also, don't be surprised if online and mobile video sees a big boost in parts of the world where television is restricted.

Click the audio player above to hear more.

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