National News

Hurricane Arthur Is No Match For Man In Ocean With Facebook

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-04 06:14

Richard Neal, of Mint Hill., N.C., chronicled the storm from his point of view, which was a pretty darn good one.

» E-Mail This

Richard Mellon Scaife, Philanthropist, Conservative Donor, Dies

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-04 06:13

The heir to the Mellon banking and oil fortune revealed in May that he had been diagnosed with cancer. Scaife was 82.

» E-Mail This

Hollywood turns to... taxidermy?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-07-04 06:12

On Sunday morning in Downtown Los Angeles taxidermist Allis Markham immediately cuts into her subject for the day: a bird.

She started her studio, Prey Taxidermy, this March and rents her mounted pieces to Hollywood films, television sets, and photoshoots. She recently worked on a shoot for Disney featuring Taylor Swift as Rapunzel.

“I did some combing pigeons for them,” she says. “Bird skin is like working with wet toilet paper with feathers attached. And so it’s this very tedious process where you’re making all these incisions.”

Animals rights groups, including PETA, have criticized Hollywood in recent years after news broke that animals were harmed on Hollywood sets. On the now-canceled HBO show, “Luck,” four thoroughbred horses died during production. According to reports, the horses were elderly, underfed, and possibly even drugged. Due to these alleged abuses, taxidermy businesses are catering to studios who are looking to minimize their legal and safety risks. “If you want to have a tiger on set, it’s a lot safer when it’s dead,” Markham says.

Wayne Carlisi inherited his father’s big game taxidermy collection, and in 2012, he opened ArtKraft Taxidermy in North Hollywood. His company rents out lions, antelope, and rhinos to studios including Warner Brothers and Paramount. Carlisi says, in the special effects ridden world of entertainment, taxidermied animals serve a new purpose.

“They’re [computer graphics animators] able to scan the actual mount into the computer,” he says, after which studios will build rigs and transpose them on the animal’s body. “So from rigs they can make the animals move and perform the way they want.”

Smaller production companies are also vested in mounted animals for its cost effectiveness. David Anderson, an independent filmmaker, says directors like himself often have no choice but to use taxidermied animals.

Renting an animal actor gets expensive when final costs include handlers, insurance, and a representative from the Humane Society. Markham’s larger pieces, like a bear, could can run up to $1,500, while the cost of a live animal can easily shoot into the $8,000 range. Because of all of the additional costs, Anderson turned to Markham for his latest movie.

Yet others in the industry, including set decorator Kristin Peterson, think something is lost when Hollywood productions use mounted animals instead of live animals.

“The taxidermied animals don’t have as much of a personality as the live animal,” she says.

Clashes Erupt In Jerusalem Over Palestinian Teen's Funeral

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-04 05:25

Palestinians say the 16-year-old was killed by Israeli extremists. His body was found just days after the recovery of the bodies of three Israeli teens in the West Bank.

» E-Mail This

Weakened Arthur Heads Up U.S. East Coast

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-04 04:44

The National Hurricane Center predicted further weakening as the Category 1 storm moved offshore. Arthur knocked out power for about 44,000 people in North Carolina.

» E-Mail This

Ex-Editor Gets 18 Months In U.K. Phone Hacking Case

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-04 04:29

Andy Coulson, the former editor of the now defunct News of the World, was found guilty last week of conspiracy to hack personal voicemails.

» E-Mail This

Big Data Comes To College

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-04 03:38

The exploding field of "learning analytics" raises ethical questions similar to those arising from the recent Facebook revelations.

» E-Mail This

Bored On The Fourth Of July? Try These Movies

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-04 03:03

Action, singing and lots of fireworks — American movies celebrate the Fourth of July.

» E-Mail This

ON THE AIR
BBC World Service
Next Up: @ 05:00 am
Democracy Now

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4