National News

Stephen Colbert: The End Of One Joke, The Start Of Many More

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 13:33

Eric Deggans looks at the move by Stephen Colbert from the show he does in character on Comedy Central to CBS late night.

» E-Mail This

Greece is back in the bond market

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 13:27

For the first time in four years, Greece has sold long-term government bonds to international investors—and found a hungry market. It sold 3 billion Euros ($4.14 billion) worth of five-year notes priced at a yield of 4.95 percent—lower than economists expected. And the issue was oversubscribed.

Greece defaulted on its debts in 2012 and nearly crashed the Eurozone. Its economy is now improving, with a return to minimal growth this year after years of deep recession. Still, the government is heavily in debt, more than 25 percent of the population is unemployed (and a higher percentage among young workers), and there are frequent strikes against austerity measures.

Fiscal reforms, wage and benefit cuts, improvements in tax collections—plus bailouts from the EU and IMF—have helped pull the country back from the brink of financial collapse and a chaotic exit from the Euro. But the reason investors now appear willing to take a risk funding Greek debt may have more to do with a statement made by European Central Bank president Mario Draghi at an investment conference in London in July 2012: “Within our mandate, the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the Euro. And believe me, it will be enough.”

Economist Barry Bosworth at the Brookings Institution says that statement gave new life to the economic fortunes—and sovereign debt—of Europe’s troubled peripheral countries. Those include Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Italy—and especially, Greece. “At that point investors said, ‘oh, Greece is not really risky. It’s being backed by the full faith and credit of the Eurozone,’” says Bosworth.

Investors now believe no Eurozone country—even Greece—will be allowed to default or pull out of the common currency, says Bosworth.

Greece’s credit rating remains poor, but it is offering relatively high interest to investors—nearly 5 percent—much more than they would earn on safer U.S. or German bonds.

“Global investors are still looking for attractive places to put their cash,” says economic strategist John Canally at LPL Financial in Boston.

Picking up the tab for MH370 search

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 13:20

There are affordable technologies currently on the market that would have rendered the search for MH370 much quicker.  Corporate jet owners use them.  Even Air France Flight 447 subscribed to tracking services.  In the case of MH370, a back up battery system could have maintained the tracking systems available.  

Ryan Budget Vote Produces 'Win' For Both Parties

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 13:09

Democrats made lots of speeches about the horrors of the GOP's Ryan budget. Republicans made lots of speeches about its wonders. The actual effect on public policy? None.

» E-Mail This

What's A Breath Of Fresh Air Worth? In China, About $860

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 13:06

A Beijing artist who collected a jar of air from Provence, France, sold it at auction "to question China's foul air and express dissatisfaction."

» E-Mail This

One-Day Sale: Google Glass Will Be Available For A Cool $1,500

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:59

The wearable computing headset will be available for anyone to purchase, for one day only, on Tuesday. Google says it's expanding the Glass testing program to get more feedback.

» E-Mail This

For Albuquerque PD, A Searing Rebuke From Justice Department

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:56

The Albuquerque Police Department has engaged in excessive force and unreasonable deadly force, according to a civil rights investigation by the Department of Justice.

» E-Mail This

Sebelius resigns after Obamacare woes

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:43

Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of Health and Human Services, says the government is making "tremendous progress" toward fixing what she called a broken health system. 
Sebelius commented Friday after President Barack Obama announced her resignation and says he will nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, to replace her.

Sebelius's departure comes as the Obama administration seeks to move past the woes of the initial rollout of Obamacare, which included a website launch marred by glitches, an unexpected cancellation of some Americans' individual health insurance policies and seemingly endless delays of key deadlines and requirements.

Sebelius faced a high-profile grilling in front of a Congressional panel over the botched rollout of Healthcare.gov, and mentions of her all but disappeared from the President's public comments and addresses regarding the ACA. Most notably, Sebelius did not even appear at President Obama's triumphant announcement of 7 million Obamacare enrollees in the White House Rose Garden last week.

According to The New York Times, Sebelius approached the president last month about the decision. Sebelius was previously the governor of Kansas, until she was nominated for the cabinet position in 2009.

Sebelius will resign after Obamacare woes

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:43

Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of Health and Human Services, will resign after serving five years in the position and presiding over the rollout of the Affordable Care Act.

President Obama accepted Sebelius's resignation earlier in the week, and on Friday will nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, to replace her, according to White House officials.

Sebelius's departure comes as the Obama administration seeks to move past the woes of the initial rollout of Obamacare, which included a website launch marred by glitches, an unexpected cancellation of some Americans' individual health insurance policies and seemingly endless delays of key deadlines and requirements.

Sebelius faced a high-profile grilling in front of a Congressional panel over the botched rollout of Healthcare.gov, and mentions of her all but disappeared from the President's public comments and addresses regarding the ACA. Most notably, Sebelius did not even appear at President Obama's triumphant announcement of 7 million Obamacare enrollees in the White House Rose Garden last week.

According to The New York Times, Sebelius approached the president last month about the decision. Sebelius was previously the governor of Kansas, until she was nominated for the cabinet position in 2009.

God Save The Queen — And Donetsk, Too?

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:40

The eastern Ukrainian city is caught in a tug of war between Kiev and Moscow. A tongue-in-cheek campaign is presenting a third option: annexation by Britain. After all, a Welshman founded it in 1884

» E-Mail This

The GPS trade-off: Get lost less often, but lose privacy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:34

In the age of Google Maps, Siri, and GPS, it is hard to get lost.

"You can if you really, really work at it,” says Hiawatha Bray, technology reporter at the Boston Globe and author of “You are Here: From the Compass to GPS, the History and Future of How We Find Ourselves.”

“The whole idea of being able to navigate through the world with a higher degree of reliability is one of the most challenging technical problems the human race has ever faced, and it’s taken us centuries to beat it.”

But this technological achievement has come at a price, says Bray: Privacy.

Bray says many technologies weren’t designed to track people, but some companies -- and governments -- are using it to do just that. Cell phones and license plate scanners have new, unforseen second purposes. Many cities regularly scan the license plates of vehicles driving their streets.

"There’s no limit right now, under law, [on] how long you can keep those records," Bray says. “I don’t want to get lost, I just don’t want others to constantly track my location.”

Utah Gay Marriage Gets Hearing In Appeals Court

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

Same-sex marriage went before an appeals court in Utah on Thursday. It's the first federal appellate court to hear a marriage case after the 2013 marriage equality decisions from the U.S. Supreme Court. Colorado Public Radio's Megan Verlee was in the courtroom for the hearing.

» E-Mail This

Egyptian Journalist Trial Is Long On Jail Time — But Short On Proof

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

Audie Cornish talks to NPR's Leila Fadel in Cairo about the ongoing trial of Al-Jazeera journalists. The journalists have now been in jail for more than 100 days.

» E-Mail This

Colbert Plans To Take Up The Late Night Mic For CBS

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

CBS announced that comedian Stephen Colbert will replace David Letterman as a late night host on the network. Letterman, who turns 67 on Saturday, announced his retirement last week.

» E-Mail This

Out Of Delhi, A Potential Sea Change For India Election

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

Thursday's a milestone day in India's long election, as 11 states and territories vote on seats in the lower house of parliament. The ruling Congress Party is suffering under anti-incumbent sentiment.

» E-Mail This

Austin Hosts Presidents Past And Present To Honor Civil Rights

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

President Obama is in Austin, Texas, honoring the legacy of President Lyndon Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He's one of four U.S. presidents to appear at a civil rights summit this week.

» E-Mail This

Budget Bomb-Throwing Resumes With Party Line Vote

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

The House voted Thursday to approve the budget introduced by Paul Ryan. It was passed on a party line vote. NPR's Tamara Keith joins the program to talk politics and policy.

» E-Mail This

A Year After Bombings, Some Say 'Boston Strong' Has Gone Overboard

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

The slogan is plastered on cars, cut into the grass at Fenway, tattooed on arms, bedazzled on sweatshirts and printed on T-shirts (and everything else). But some wonder whether it's time to retire it.

» E-Mail This

Drilling Frenzy Fuels Sudden Growth In Small Texas Town

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:08

The boom has brought unexpected prosperity — and many new problems — to Cotulla. It's in the heart of the Eagle Ford Shale area, which has quickly become the nation's No. 2 oil-producing region.

» E-Mail This

GM To Take $1.3 Billion Charge Linked To Recall

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 12:01

The announcement comes on the same day that the automaker said it was suspending two engineers linked to the ignition switch defect that triggered the recall.

» E-Mail This

ON THE AIR
Beggar's Banquet
Next Up: @ 12:00 am
Echoes

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4