National News

Country in revolt? Hire a PR firm.

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-07-11 11:14

It’s been three months since the Islamist group Boko Haram kidnapped more than two hundred  schoolgirls in Nigeria. The Nigerian government has yet to free the girls, and it’s come under criticism for its handling of the crisis. It’s also been shamed by the global campaign #BringBackOurGirls, which even Michelle Obama got in on.

So what’s a country with a bad rap to do? Get some PR, of course.

“I think there is a narrative that the government was not doing enough,” says Mark Irion, president of the public relations firm LEVICK, which signed a $1.2 million contract to galvanize support for the Nigerian government and its fight against terrorism.

LEVICK’s motto is "Communicating trust." Irion says much of the storyline about Nigeria’s tepid response to the crisis “is not true.”

“There are things that are underway and are public,” he says. “And there are things that, of course, cannot be publicly discussed. But, yes, there is a false narrative that we intend to correct.”

It’s no coincidence the Washington Post recently ran an op-ed from Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan. “My silence has been necessary,” he wrote, “to avoid compromising the details of our investigation.”

(Here’s a tongue-in-cheek response to that piece.)

 J. Peter Pham directs the Africa Center at the Atlantic Council. He says the fact is Nigeria has failed to deal with Boko Haram over the years.

“You cannot spin that reality any more than you can spin the fact that there are more than two hundred schoolgirls still missing and Boko Haram continues to attack with impunity throughout northeastern Nigeria,” he says.

Now, trying to improve the image of foreign governments is nothing new. It’s big business for PR firms like Ketchum Inc., which made more than $10 million from its foreign clients last year, including the Russia Federation and Gazprom. (You can see that tabulation here, via the Sunlight Foundation.) Ketchum continued to represent Russia through the turmoil in Ukraine.

Still, part of this business is knowing who to represent and when to stop.

“You know everyone has their own litmus test,” says Toby Moffett, a former Congressman who used to run The Moffett Group. That was the M in the PLM Group, the trio of firms that lobbied and did communications for Egypt under Hosni Mubarak and the military council that replaced him.

That representation continued until Egyptian police raided U.S.-backed NGOs and barred some Americans from leaving the country.

“I did receive a call from a friend who happened to be President Obama’s Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood,” Moffett recalls. “And Ray was not happy, to put it mildly.”

LaHood’s son was one of the Americans who was temporarily trapped in Egypt. Moffett says he would’ve dropped the Egypt account anyway. Still…

“You know there was that kind of gentle persuasion, shall we say,” he says.

When it comes to foreign governments, it turns out gentle persuasion can run both ways.

One postscript: In October, Egypt signed a new contract with another communications firm, The Glover Park Group. That representation will cost the country $250,000 a month.

Host: It’s been three months since the Islamist group Boko Haram kidnapped hundreds of schoolgirls in Nigeria. The Nigerian government has yet to free them … it’s also been shamed by that global campaign … hashtag-bring-back-our-girls. Even Michelle Obama got in on that. So what’s a country with a bad rap to do? Get some PR, of course. Kate Davidson reports.

 Here’s what Nigeria’s image problem sounds like:

News montage: The authorities had no number for how many girls were taken/The country’s first lady expressed doubts that there was any kidnapping./A government with no idea where they are – We want our girls back now. Now.

That … is a PR nightmare. Which is why someone in Nigeria called in the image pros.

Irion: I think there is a narrative that the government was not doing enough.

Mark Irion is president of the public relations firm Levick, which signed a 1.2 million dollar contract to galvanize support for the Nigerian government and its fight against terrorism. Levick’s motto is communicating trust. Irion says much of the storyline about Nigeria’s tepid response…

Irion: …is not true. There are things that are underway and are public. And there are things that, of course, cannot be publicly discussed. But yes, there is a false narrative that we intend to correct.

It’s no coincidence the Washington Post recently ran an op-ed from Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan. “My silence has been necessary,” he wrote, “to avoid compromising the details of our investigation.” J Peter Pham directs the Africa Center at the Atlantic Council. He says the fact is Nigeria has failed to deal with Boko Haram over the years.

Pham: You cannot spin that reality any more than you can spin the fact that there are more than two hundred schoolgirls still missing and Boko Haram continues to attack with impunity throughout Northeastern Nigeria.

Now, trying to improve the image of foreign governments is nothing new. It’s big business for PR firms like Ketchum … which made more than ten million dollars from foreign clients like Russia last year. Ketchum continued to represent Russia after it annexed Crimea. Still, part of this business is knowing who to represent and when to stop.

Moffett: You know everyone has their own litmus test.

Toby Moffett is a former Congressman who used to run The Moffett Group … one of the firms that lobbied and did PR for Egypt under Hosni Mubarak, and the military council that replaced him. Until, that is, Egyptian police raided US-backed NGOs and barred some Americans from leaving the country.

Moffett: I did receive a call from a friend who happened to be President Obama’s Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. And Ray was not happy, to put it mildly.

LaHood’s son was one of the Americans who was temporarily trapped in Egypt. Moffett says he would’ve dropped the Egypt account anyway … but …

Moffett: You know there was that kind of gentle persuasion, shall we say.

When it comes to foreign governments, it turns out gentle persuasion can run both ways. I’m Kate Davidson, for Marketplace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Good weather drives corn prices to record low

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-07-11 11:09

Corn prices fell to a record low; it hasn’t been this cheap in almost four years. Weather conditions are favorable for the crops at this point, and that means surpluses. But with so much corn, can farmers sell it all?

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"We are gearing it up for storage," says Alverson. They’ve added more bunker storage to hold the corn and are preparing for a big harvest.

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Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-07-11 10:49

Those various and sundry airport taxes may have finally jumped the shark.

Outbound passengers at the international airport in Caracas, Venezuela will now have to pay 127 Bolívar - about $20 at the official rate of exchange - to breathe.

The government apparently needs it cover the cost of a newly-installed system that uses ozone to purify the air conditioning system.

No word on what happens if you don't pay.

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Border Patrol Ceases Flying Migrants To San Diego

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-11 09:40

The practice came under fire last week, when opponents prevented two buses holding detained migrants from entering a Border Patrol facility in Murrieta, Calif.

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If Exercise Is Work, Mindless Snacking May Follow

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-11 09:19

The idea that sacrificing at the gym entitles us to a reward seems to be embedded in our collective thinking. Researchers set out to test how this affects how we eat after a workout.

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It's 'Etsy,' Kenyan Style: Making Art Out Of Flip-Flops And Bottle Tops

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This summer, Kenyan artists came to Washington, D.C., for the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Some of them make their living by turning trash into sculptures, jewelry and igloos.

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The NBA star will play for the Cavaliers next season. He opted out of his contract with the Heat after spending four seasons in Miami.

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Avoiding The Border: Is This Obama's Hurricane Katrina?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-11 08:18

The president says he's working on addressing the surge of unauthorized border crossings into the U.S. But is his decision to not visit the border an epic mistake? The Barbershop guys weigh in.

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With Brazil Out Of The World Cup, Was The Price Tag Worth It?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-11 08:18

Host Michel Martin learns more about what's happening at the World Cup, both on and off the field, in the days leading up to the final match on Sunday.

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Kurds Seize 2 Oil Fields Amid Rising Tensions With Iraqi Government

NPR News - Fri, 2014-07-11 08:15

The Kurdish political bloc also suspended all participation in the government. The moves further imperil Iraq's already tenuous unity.

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