National News

Don't mess with French workers' 35 hour work week

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 09:57

From France, home of the 35 hour work week, this item: French tech sector employees  have just struck a new collective bargaining agreement, under the terms of which they are guaranteed that after-hours emails -- as in the kind we all check on our phones while at a soccer game -- will not impinge on that aforesaid 35 hour week.

Workers now have the unimpeded right to unplug at quitting time.

To this story, one can only say, zut alors, sacre bleu and 'How do I get me some of that action'?

How Bad Is Brazil's Crime? Watch This Mugging On Live TV

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 09:49

A television network was conducting a live interview with a woman about Rio's rampant street crime when a robber brazenly ripped a gold chain from the woman's neck.

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What A Ban On Taxi Apps In Shanghai Says About China's Economy

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 09:42

The smartphone apps let people summon cabs and negotiate prices directly with drivers. Officials say they benefit the young and the rich. But they're also a free-market challenge to state control.

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Justice: Albuquerque Police Show 'Pattern Of Excessive Force'

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 09:12

After a nearly 18-month investigation, the Justice Department has concluded that the city's police department uses deadly force more often than is necessary, in violation of the Fourth Amendment.

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Is Everything More Delicious When You Eat With Your Hands?

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 08:30

An Indian-American reporter recalls the deep shame he felt as a kid eating Indian food with his hands. But his daughter reminds him of the true joy of hand-eating, and he decides to try it in public.

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'Gospel Of Jesus's Wife' Papyrus Not A Forgery, Harvard Says

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 08:25

The tiny fragment, written in Egyptian Coptic, contains a purported reference by Jesus to his wife. New evidence dates it to between the sixth and ninth centuries.

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Stephen Colbert Will Take Over 'Late Show'

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 08:24

The Comedy Central star will sit behind the desk after David Letterman retires next year, CBS announced Thursday.

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Wonk Week In Washington: When Briefings Are Better Than Blossoms

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 07:41

Let the tourists stare at the cherry blossoms. This week, with its World Bank and IMF meetings, is for the true, serious wonks who just can't get enough of lecture halls and soggy hors d'oeuvres.

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'Will I Survive, Or Will I Die?' Stabbing Survivor Wondered

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 07:29

Brett Hurt was one of the first students stabbed Wednesday at a high school near Pittsburgh. He credits a friend for saving his life and hopes his attacker will "forgive himself."

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PODCAST: From bailout to IPO

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 07:16

Ally Financial is trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday, under the ticker symbol ALLY. The company, you might remember, had to be bailed out by the government in 2008, as part of the Troubled Asset Relief Program or TARP, to the tune of $17.2 billion. The stock sale puts the government a step closer to sloughing off what remains of the financial crisis bailouts.

With Ukraine refusing to pay its gas bills to Russia's Gazprom and Europe looking for alternative energy sources, Russia -- it seems -- is on the outs. But now Putin is turning his attention eastward, towards China, and may be finding a friend. Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, joins Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to discuss Russia's balancing act and why the country might try to disrupt Ukraine's upcoming elections.

Teenagers are now spending as much, if not more, on food as on clothing, according to Piper Jaffray’s semi-annual report on teen spending, out this week. And teenager's new favorite place to spend money? Starbucks.

 

 

Mon Dieu! No More Work Email At Home For Some French Workers

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 06:56

Under new rules, about 1 million tech workers and consultants will be required to switch off their work phones outside office hours.

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New Ping In Search For Flight 370 Boosts Hopes Of Finding Jet

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 06:53

Angus Houston, the coordinator of the search off Australia's west coast, says he's "now optimistic" that the aircraft, or what's left of it, will be found.

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The Story Flips: Burger King Says It Isn't Moving Into Crimea

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 05:24

A Russian franchisee had said the fast-food empire was looking to extend its rule into the disputed territory. Now, the company says stories about those comments were overdone.

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Weekly Jobless Claims Drop To Near 7-Year Low

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 04:48

There were 300,000 applications filed last week. That's the fewest since May 2007. Economists say the data are another sign that the labor market is gaining some strength.

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'Stay With Me, Bud,' Mom Told Baby After Mudslide Trapped Them

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 04:00

Amanda Skorjanc's home in Oso, Wash., was among those engulfed in mud and debris on March 22. But she managed to hold on to her 6-month-old son, Duke. "I thought I was losing him," she says.

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School Stabbing Suspect Was 'Nice Young Boy,' Attorney Says

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-10 03:00

Until Wednesday, the Pennsylvania teen was a well-liked student with no known mental health problems, his lawyer says. Now the 16-year-old is charged in a stabbing attack that injured more than 20.

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In U.K., a case for re-opening coal mines?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 02:59

Thirty years ago, the country that started the Industrial Revolution - and fueled it with coal - scaled back its coal mining industry. The UK announced  it was closing many of its deep mines. Today only three remain, and two of those are facing closure.

But have the Brits blundered? Is there a case for  the UK re-opening its deep coal mines… and digging a little deeper?

Bob Fitzpatrick  certainly believes so. But then, he would. He’s one of  the UK’s  few remaining deep pit coal miners. 

“The coal’s here and you can get it,” says Fitzpatrick, who works at the Hatfield coal mine in Yorkshire, in the north of England. “If the mines are mined properly and managed properly they are viable.”

Then there’s the issue of energy security. The UK may have shut down most of its mines, but it still  generates 40 percent of its electricity from coal, importing the bulk of it from the U.S., Colombia and Russia.

The Russians supply the largest amount of that imported coal, and after the annexation of Crimea, that  has got some people worried. “The gas supplies and the coal supplies from Russia are now pretty doubtful,” says local Yorkshire politician Jane Hamilton. “President Putin has got his own agenda. I think we should be very careful and look to re-opening mines, because we don’t know where our energy is going to come from.”  

The case for UK coal  began to look even better last week. Geologists revealed that the country could have vast reserves of the fuel, as much as 20 trillion tons of it, lying under the sea bed off its eastern coast -- enough to keep the lights on in the UK for centuries. But the  problem with deep pit mining, let alone with burrowing under the sea for coal, is that it is horrendously expensive. And, says importer Nigel Yaxley, it’s now much cheaper for the Brits to bring in foreign coal. “At the moment prices are depressed, partly because of surplus coal in the U.S. thrown up by the shale gas revolution," he says, "and partly because of the slowdown in growth in China.”

The future of British coal seems to depend on much higher world prices and much improved technology  making it easier to mine, and cleaner to burn. The case for UK coal? Not yet proven.   

Why the Ally IPO is good news for taxpayers

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 02:57

Ally Financial is trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday, under the ticker symbol ALLY. The company, you might remember, had to be bailed out by the government in 2008, as part of the Troubled Asset Relief Program or TARP, to the tune of $17.2 billion.

The government sold 95 million shares in the company through the initial public offering, raising about $2.4 billion dollars.  Add that to the $15.3 billion Ally had already paid back, and U.S. taxpayers have made about half a billion dollars more than they invested in the company.

The stock sale puts the government a step closer to sloughing off what remains of the financial crisis bailouts.

According to the New York Times:

The firm, once General Motors’ financing arm, is the government’s last remaining holding from its enormous bailouts of the financial and auto industries.

The U.S. Department of Treasury said the Ally stock sale brings its total returns on TARP investments to $438.3 billion.  The government has handed out about $423.4 billion.  With a little math, we’re talking taxpayer profit from TARP in the neighborhood of $15 billion.

 

 

But, we're not in the clear yet.  TARP will likely still cost taxpayers. This, from the U.S. Treasury:

"Treasury's latest quarterly estimate of TARP's lifetime cost as reflected in the February 2014 Monthly Report to Congress, developed in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget, is $39.02 billion, which is largely attributable to our efforts to help struggling homeowners deal with the housing crisis. Unlike TARP's investment programs, the funds committed for TARP's housing programs were not intended to be recovered." 

 

Teens now spending as much on food as clothes

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 02:46

Teenagers are now spending as much, if not more, on food as on clothing, according to Piper Jaffray’s semi-annual report on teen spending, out this week. And teenage's new favorite place to spend money? Starbucks

“Food of course is the one category that isn’t e-commerce-able,” says senior research analyst Stephanie Wissink of Piper Jaffray. “When they indicate they’re spending more on food that most likely means they’re also frequenting food locations more regularly.”

Wissink says it’s a misconception that teens want to be alone with their phones. Looks like they want to be together – with their phones – in places like Starbucks.

"Starbucks probably has the most widely-used app at the point of sale system," says Morningstar analyst RJ Hottovy. "So when people are making purchases, their app is used for one in every five purchases at this point."

Why automakers are getting into healthcare

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-10 02:44

A new report from PricewaterhouseCoopers highlights growing opportunity in the healthcare sector. 

In fact, the report lays out that almost half of the Fortune 50 companies – firms that previously did not have anything to do with healthcare – are getting into the game.

“The money is starting to move differently,” says the report’s author, Ceci Connolly, the head of the Health Research Institute at PricewaterhouseCoopers. "More and more of us are having to spend our own dollars, and make our own health care decisions."

Because of the Affordable Care Act, millions more Americans have health insurance, technology is changing, and we have seen “the rise of the consumer.”

The report highlight's Ford's work on a system that would help drivers with chronic conditions.

"These sorts of pushes toward more consumer-directed health care might be a good thing," says Zack Cooper, a health policy professor at Yale. He says access to data and access to information means we're not as reliant on experts.

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