National News

Should HPV Testing Replace The Pap Smear?

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:24

The recent FDA approval of an HPV test to screen for cervical cancer has ignited debate among doctors. Some say the viral test will catch cancers earlier. Others warn it increases needless biopsies.

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Without A Marijuana Breathalyzer, How To Curb Stoned Driving?

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:21

Legal pot sales are growing in Colorado, and the state has a marijuana DUI blood standard for drivers. But without a pot breathalyzer, it's hard to measure how high someone is.

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For N.J. Mayor, The Time To Adapt To Rising Sea Levels Is Now

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:20

Hoboken, N.J., has experienced several major floods since Hurricane Sandy. Mayor Dawn Zimmer says her city isn't waiting to prepare for the effects of climate change.

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Why Those Tiny Microbeads In Soap May Pose Problem For Great Lakes

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:20

The plastic beads in some face soaps look a lot like fish food when they end up in the water. Two states are close to banning the beads, which researchers say can spread toxins through the food chain.

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Double Trouble For Coffee: Drought And Disease Send Prices Up

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:18

Coffee prices have spiked this year because of drought in Brazil and a disease that's crippling coffee production in parts of Central America. Coffee traders says prices could rise to $3 a pound.

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Don't Judge Exceptional Players By The Company They Keep

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:17

Many of sports history's greatest athletes never led their teams to a championship victory. So why should it be a requirement for basketball stars today?

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Relatives Of Kidnapped Girls: Bring Them Back — But Alive

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:16

Now that the Nigerian military seems to be serious about rescuing girls kidnapped by Islamist extremists, relatives worry that firepower alone won't save them. They want the government to negotiate.

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If I tweet at you, will you come?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-05-20 23:12

Indulge me for a second here, while I digress, would you? (I know, I haven't really said anything to digress from, but let's not get hung up on the details, shall we?) There's a fistful of business and/or economic stories I could touch on right now: Credit Suisse and its guilty plea, AT&T buying DirecTV, Jamie Dimon and his pay raise, GM's latest recall... and so on and so on.

But the truth is, these daily stories can be a dime a dozen. You wake up, you report something, you tell people about it. Lather, rinse, repeat.

The bigger issue for me this week, honestly, has been systemic.

Largely lost in the news of Jill Abramson being fired from the top job at the New York Times was the leaking of a long and sophisticated report (by a team led by A.G. Sulzberger, the son of the man who fired Abramson, Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger) on the Times' digital future. Companies, both inside and oustide journalism, come out with "Our Digital Future" memos all the time.

The Full New York Times Innovation Report

But the Times being the Times, this one's going to resonate. As it should. It's well researched, clearly written, and insightful. I want to pull out two related but separate points:

1. "Audience Development." It used to be that we'd put a story on the radio (or a newspaper would put the story in the paper), the audience would come listen or read it, and that would be it. Distribution made simple. Catch is, of course, that it's waaaaay more complicated now. We're all so distracted and pulled at and tugged on by Twitter feeds and Facebook and all the rest that we (journalists, that is) have to figure out a way to get you to pay attention. The Sulzberger report (and many many others, to be fair) calls it 'audience development.' So here's what I want to know from you guys:

How do you want to be... developed? (Courted, if you will.) If I tweet at you, will you come? Shout-outs to our website? Are you a podcast person and are we making that available enough to you?

Lemme know – tweet me @kairyssdal or the show @marketplace. Or comments below, I guess.

2. Ummm... money. Here's the equation, in public media, anyway. Far and away our audience (and revenue) is tied to what goes on the radio. Which makes sense. That's what we've been doing and doing well for decades. It's not, however, where the future is. Mobile, digital, portable and personal is where we're going, yet the audience and the money aren't there yet. So how do we at least balance the scales?

How do we drive digital content that meets our standards but can't yet pay for itself?

What should we not do that we used to do? (So that we can start doing the things we have to do.)

Newspapers are trying to figure it out – all the way up to the New York Times – and so is public media, both APM (the company that owns Marketplace) and NPR. It is, honestly, kind of an existential question.

In other news, a couple of quick shoutouts from Marketplace coverage this week. First of all, the Morning Report team is in London for a special look at income inequality in the (other) global financial center. Mind the Gap, it's called – get it? Also not to be missed is a two-parter from David Weinberg about the rebirth of American craftsmanship, risk-taking, and a really cool motorcyle.

McConnell Wins Big Over Tea Party Challenger In Kentucky

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 16:57

Sen. Mitch McConnell's large victory in Kentucky suggested that he could have a fairly unified party behind him come November.

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White House To Release Secret Memo On Drone Strikes

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 16:36

The document written by David Barron lays out the legal justification for the overseas targeting of American-born terrorist suspects. Its release could clear Barron's nomination to the federal bench.

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Federal Court Stays Execution Of Missouri Inmate

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 15:43

The appeals court granted a stay hours before Russell Bucklew was scheduled for lethal injection.

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Judge Strikes Down Pennsylvania's Gay-Marriage Ban

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 15:25

The ruling is the latest in a growing cascade of federal and state court decisions declaring a right to marry for gay couples.

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Balkan Floods Expose Deadly Mines From 1990s Civil War

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 14:58

The Bosnia and Herzegovina Mine Action Center says a decade of work to reduce the danger from land mines has been washed away by the rising waters.

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Is 'insourcing' enough to boost the U.S. economy?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-05-20 13:59

The White House opened its doors Tuesday to executives from some big companies. The occasion? Well, the Obama Administration is touting its record on what's known as "insourcing," companies making investments and expanding in the U.S. instead of abroad. The government says its SelectUSA program has helped win $18 billion in U.S. business investments so far.

But when it comes to growing manufacturing and getting the economy back on track, is insourcing going to be enough? “Our problem is that the administration seems to be clapping for investment with just one hand,” says Shaun Donnelly, with the U.S. Council for International Business. “Somehow inward investment is good and they’re absolutely silent on outward investment.”

The White House announced a second SelectUSA summit with global business representatives will be held in the Spring of 2015.

Obamacare Buried By Avalanche Of Negative Ads, Study Finds

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 13:57

According to an analysis of Affordable Care Act advertising, an unprecedented amount of money was spent on negative ads attacking the law. And very little was spent defending it.

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Shocker: No one likes ISPs or cable providers

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-05-20 13:43

In light of the Comcast-TimeWarner Cable and AT&T-DirecTV mergers, the American Customer Satisfaction Index is out with its latest survey of the telecommunications industry.

To everyone's, ahem, surprise, internet service providers (ISPs) and cable TV services are at the bottom of the bottom. ISPs got a satisfaction score of 63 out of 100, citing complaints of "high prices, poor reliability, and declining customer service," and cable companies got a low of 65. 

They're doing surprisingly well, though - if the equivalent of a C-grade can be called "well" -- cell phone companies and wireless providers, who received scores of 78 and 72 respectively.  

Royal Caribbean Offers 5-Week-Long U.S.-To-China Cruise

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 13:28

The one-time voyage is meant to inaugurate the company's new Quantum of the Seas, a 1,142-foot vessel that will hail from Shanghai.

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Despite Drama, Oregon GOP Choice Comes Down To Purity, Practicality

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 13:16

Two Republicans with compelling personal stories, Monica Wehby and Jason Conger, are vying for the chance to unseat Oregon's incumbent Democratic senator, Jeff Merkley.

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Manhattan gets its first Dairy Queen

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-05-20 13:01

There are more than 4,000 Dairy Queens in the U.S. China has nearly 600. But out of all those stores, none is on the New York island of Manhattan. That changes next week when the Minnesota-based chain opens its first Manhattan location.  

“I like to say a Blizzard is going to hit Manhattan, and really New York City as a whole,” says John Gainor, International Dairy Queen’s president and CEO. 

The Blizzard is the chain’s signature milkshake. Gainor was in town taking a look at the soon-to-open, two-story Dairy Queen on 14th Street in Manhattan. 

But this is a city with endless options for treats, from frozen yogurt to artisanal ice cream. Dairy Queen has stiff competition. Just blocks away I found a Mister Softee truck, a New York icon.  

Ric Perez working inside didn’t feel the threat. 

“People prefer Mister Softee. Yes, it is a New York thing,” he says. 

Actually, Dairy Queen CEO Gainor says his competition is any fast food restaurant. McDonald's has a McFlurry, and this Dairy Queen serves burgers. 

And, for all the talk of chains like 7-Eleven and IHOP and now Dairy Queen invading Manhattan, this one seems different. 

“New Yorkers have been very welcoming to our brand,” Gainor says. 

That’s not just CEO-talk. Many New Yorkers aren’t from here. They have a soft spot for Dairy Queen’s soft-serve, growing up in Dairy Queen towns.

“When we were younger, we’d ride our bikes there and stuff like that,” says Adam Sansone, walking near Union Square.  

More Dairy Queens are on the way for Manhattan and the other four boroughs.

They won’t necessarily replace mom and pop shops. Retail all over New York has been expanding since 1993, thanks to drastically reduced crime and a bigger population. 

“A lot of companies probably feel that they can’t afford not to be here in New York City,” says MIchael Moynihan, chief economist at the New York City Economic Development Corporation. 

Lawmakers Seek Delay On Healthy Lunch Rules For Schools

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-20 12:57

Some in Congress want to give schools more time to comply with a new law to limit calories and fat and add more veggies to meals. But nutrition advocates say it would roll back healthy gains for kids.

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