National News

High-school graduation rate hits 80 percent for first time

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 09:21
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 16:10 Joe Raedle/Getty Images

High school graduation rates have reached a new high following a decade-long campaign to raise graduation rates. A graduate wears his mortarboard with Free at Last written during the commencement ceremony for Cypress Bay High School graduates at Marlins Park on June 4, 2012 in Miami, Florida. 

For the first time, high school graduation rates in the U.S. are above 80 percent. That’s according to a report called “Building a GradNation.” The study was released today by a coalition of education groups, including Civic Enterprises, the Everyone Graduates CenterAmerica’s Promise Alliance and the Alliance for Excellent Education.

The news represents a significant improvement since 2001, when 71 percent of American teenagers graduated from high school. Researchers say several things have changed since then. One, there is better data, so the public is more aware of the problem. Two, the accountability movement in education: think "No Child Left Behind."

Robert Balfanz,  co-director of the Everyone Graduates Center and a research scientist at Johns Hopkins University, says when researchers started digging into the numbers, it showed that just 12 percent of the nation’s high schools were producing nearly half of the dropouts. Those high schools are known in education circles as “dropout factories.”  

John Bridgeland, CEO of Civic Enterprises and one of the principal authors of the report, says some of those “dropout factories” have closed. “But many of them were re-tooled or re-designed,” Bridgeland says. “Smaller learning environments have been created. More personalized, engaging, rigorous classrooms that keep these young people in school and on track to graduate.”

Some states have raised graduation rates dramatically. North Carolina went from a 68 percent graduation rate in 2005 to over 82 percent today.

Jim Key, area superintendent for high schools in Durham, North Carolina, says his district now starts tracking students who are potential dropouts while they are still in middle school. Then the district sends them to ninth grade a few weeks early.

“That gives them a chance to become more acclimated to high school, to build some positive relationship with a few teachers, administrators and counselors,” Key says. It just gives those students a leg up, if you will, on being prepared for high school, to understand the expectations and what’s at stake.”

 What’s at stake is earning power, among other things. John Bridgeland says a high school graduate “will make $1 million more over his or her life time, than a high school dropout.”

 College graduates, of course, do even better. The latest statistics, however, show that fewer high school graduates are applying to college. Just under two-thirds of the class of 2013 attended college in the fall.

By Shea Huffman/Marketplace

Marketplace for Monday April 28, 2014by Sarah GardnerPodcast Title High-school graduation rate hits 80 percent for first timeStory Type News StorySyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

North Korea Issues Sexist Tirade Against South Korean Leader

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 09:20

South Korean President Park Guen-hye was called a "capricious whore who asks her fancy man to do harm to other person while providing sex to him." The "fancy man" in question: President Obama.

» E-Mail This

New Film 'All About Ann' Looks At The Life Of A Texan Leader

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 08:31

A new HBO film, All About Ann: Governor Richards of the Lone Star State looks at one of the most formidable political figures of her time, and the last Democrat ever to serve as governor of Texas.

» E-Mail This

Steve Jobs' Death Inspired Goal To Get Kids Coding

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 08:30

Many public schools do not offer computer science classes, even though tech workers are in high demand. Now 30 public school districts have partnered with the nonprofit Code.org to get kids coding.

» E-Mail This

South Sudan: History Was Always Against Us

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 08:29

South Sudan is reeling after rebels reportedly massacred hundreds of civilians last week. Host Michel Martin learns what this means for the future of the young country.

» E-Mail This

Do Fans Have Any Responsibility After Sterling's Comments?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 08:29

Host Michel Martin speaks with business ethicist Jack Marshall about an appropriate response from the NBA, the players and the public after allegedly racist comments made by the L.A. Clippers' owner.

» E-Mail This

Should Bigotry Get You Kicked Out Of The NBA?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 08:29

There has been widespread outrage to racist comments allegedly made by L.A. Clippers' owner Donald Sterling. Host Michel Martin learns more from sports columnists William Rhoden and Christine Brennan.

» E-Mail This

Utah Mom Accused Of Killing 6 Of Her Babies Charged With Murder

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 08:21

Megan Huntsman is accused of killing the children after giving birth to them between 1996 and 2006. She was arrested after her estranged husband discovered one body while cleaning out the garage.

» E-Mail This

What can the NBA do about unwanted owners?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 06:52

The National Basketball Association says it's first order of business is to verify whether or not it's the voice of the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, Donald Sterling, making disparaging remarks about African American people. The tape is allegedly a conversation between Sterling and his mixed-race girlfriend V. Stiviano. The man on the tape urges Stiviano not to bring her black friends to LA Clippers games. Taking photos with black people is like, quote, "talking to the enemy." Magic Johnson and Charles Barclay are among former NBA players who say if the tape is really the Clipper's owner then Sterling can't keep owning the team. For some perspective, we turn to Kenneth Shropshire, director of the Wharton Sports Business Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania.

And, a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Care Center finds that breast-cancer survivors have a high rate of long-term unemployment. And the specific kind of treatment they get, may lower their chances of keeping their job or finding a new job years later.

Meanwhile, with a hint of the week ahead when it comes to not just those markets but to the economy and jobs, we check in with Carl Riccadona, senior US economist, Deutsche Bank Securities in New York.

Pediatricians Say Training Can Help Teens Avoid Knee Injuries

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 06:50

A leading group of pediatricians says specialized exercises can help young athletes protect their anterior cruciate ligaments. After puberty, female athletes are especially vulnerable to ACL tears.

» E-Mail This

Want to buy a Tesla in China? Take a number.

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 06:27
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 07:26 FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

A worker walks past a covered car at the booth of electric carmaker Tesla on March 3, 2014 on the eve of the press day of the Geneva Motor Show in Geneva. 

What is it about some products -- Furbies, iPhones, Nintendos -- that get us to wait in line to buy them? In China, the carmaker Tesla is inspiring a queue of its own, a months-long virtual waiting list to buy the Tesla S.

Cao Wenbo, a 36-year-old film producer in Shanghai, joins Morning Report host David Brancaccio to talk about what got him to sign up for the all-electric sportscar. Click on the audio player above to hear more. 

Marketplace Morning Report for Monday April 28, 2014Interview by David BrancaccioPodcast Title Want to buy a Tesla in China? Take a number.Story Type News StorySyndication Flipboard BusinessSlackerSoundcloudStitcherBusiness InsiderSwellPMPApp Respond No

Australia: Search For Missing Airliner To Enter 'New Phase'

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 06:19

Prime Minister Tony Abbott says it's time to concentrate on searching the seafloor, but he acknowledges that at this point, it is possible nothing from MH370 will ever be found.

» E-Mail This

Breast-cancer survivors and long-term unemployment

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 06:03
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 08:57 Larry French/Getty Images

A recent study found that breast cancer survivors have a high rate of long-term unemployment. The image illustrates cancer survivors that were welcomed before a game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Denver Broncos at M&T Bank Stadium in 2010 in Baltimore, Maryland.

A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Care Center finds that breast cancer survivors have a high rate of long-term unemployment. The specific kind of treatment they get may lower their chances of keeping their job or finding a new job years later.

University of Michigan oncology professor Reshma Jagsi is lead author on the study, published in the journal “Cancer.” She says her team surveyed breast cancer survivors in Detroit and Los Angeles from 2005 to 2007, and narrowed their results to follow the women who were working at the time they were diagnosed.

Approximately 30 percent were unemployed four years later.

“I don’t think too many of us are surprised to hear patients are likely to miss work or even stop working altogether while getting chemotherapy treatment,” says Jagsi. What did surprise her? That women who received chemotherapy at the beginning of treatment had an even higher rate of unemployment four years on. Other studies have found lower levels of long-term unemployment among women who want to keep working after being treated for breast cancer.

Ragsi says knowing the possible long-term implications—on employment and personal finances—might help women and their doctors make decisions about whether to utilize chemotherapy early on in treatment.

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) passed in 1993 protects women who need time off for medical treatment, says Cathy Ruckelshaus at the National Employment Law Project. However: “It basically covers mostly full-time workers,” says Ruckelshaus. “She has to have been there for a year, and she’s entitled to 12 weeks of job-protected leave.” Ruckelshaus says the leave is unpaid, and can be taken intermittently over an extended period (i.e., not in a consecutive twelve-week period) to deal with chemotherapy treatment, side effects or long-term consequences such as fatigue.

If a woman still can’t keep up with a full-time schedule, or needs additional time off for follow-up treatment after her twelve weeks of FMLA are up, she can attempt to qualify for disability. If she can still work, then the Americans with Disability Act might require the employer to accommodate her with a flexible or part-time schedule, or provide the possibility of telecommuting, says Ruckelshaus.

Marketplace Morning Report for Monday April 28, 2014by Mitchell HartmanPodcast Title Breast-cancer survivors face high rates of long-term unemploymentStory Type News StorySyndication SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond No

Breast-cancer survivors and long-term unemployment

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 05:57

A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Care Center finds that breast cancer survivors have a high rate of long-term unemployment. The specific kind of treatment they get may lower their chances of keeping their job or finding a new job years later.

University of Michigan oncology professor Reshma Jagsi is lead author on the study, published in the journal “Cancer.” She says her team surveyed breast cancer survivors in Detroit and Los Angeles from 2005 to 2007, and narrowed their results to follow the women who were working at the time they were diagnosed.

Approximately 30 percent were unemployed four years later.

“I don’t think too many of us are surprised to hear patients are likely to miss work or even stop working altogether while getting chemotherapy treatment,” says Jagsi. What did surprise her? That women who received chemotherapy at the beginning of treatment had an even higher rate of unemployment four years on. Other studies have found lower levels of long-term unemployment among women who want to keep working after being treated for breast cancer.

Ragsi says knowing the possible long-term implications—on employment and personal finances—might help women and their doctors make decisions about whether to utilize chemotherapy early on in treatment.

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) passed in 1993 protects women who need time off for medical treatment, says Cathy Ruckelshaus at the National Employment Law Project. However: “It basically covers mostly full-time workers,” says Ruckelshaus. “She has to have been there for a year, and she’s entitled to 12 weeks of job-protected leave.” Ruckelshaus says the leave is unpaid, and can be taken intermittently over an extended period (i.e., not in a consecutive twelve-week period) to deal with chemotherapy treatment, side effects or long-term consequences such as fatigue.

If a woman still can’t keep up with a full-time schedule, or needs additional time off for follow-up treatment after her twelve weeks of FMLA are up, she can attempt to qualify for disability. If she can still work, then the Americans with Disability Act might require the employer to accommodate her with a flexible or part-time schedule, or provide the possibility of telecommuting, says Ruckelshaus.

Basketball Analyst Jack Ramsay Dies at 89

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 05:38

Ramsay coached the Portland Trail Blazers to an NBA title before embarking on a long career as a basketball analyst for ESPN. The Hall of Fame coach had been battling cancer.

» E-Mail This

Egyptian Court Hands Down 683 Death Sentences

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 04:58

It's the second mass death sentence in just two months in Egypt; however, all but 37 of the 529 people convicted in March had their sentences commuted.

» E-Mail This

Rep. Michael Grimm Pleads Not Guilty To Fraud Charges

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 04:43

The New York Republican is facing a 20-count federal indictment, including charges of mail fraud, wire fraud and tax fraud. He turned himself in Monday, and was later released on $400,000 bail.

» E-Mail This

Want to buy a Tesla in China? Take a number.

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-04-28 04:26

What is it about some products -- Furbies, iPhones, Nintendos -- that get us to wait in line to buy them? In China, the carmaker Tesla is inspiring a queue of its own, a months-long virtual waiting list to buy the Tesla S.

Cao Wenbo, a 36-year-old film producer in Shanghai, joins Morning Report host David Brancaccio to talk about what got him to sign up for the all-electric sportscar. Click on the audio player above to hear more. 

U.S. Announces New Sanctions On Russia Over Ukraine Unrest

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 03:17

President Obama says the U.S. and European partners want the new economic sanctions against Moscow to change the calculus over the situation in Ukraine.

» E-Mail This

Killer Tornadoes Rip Through Arkansas, Oklahoma

NPR News - Mon, 2014-04-28 02:35

The most powerful of the twisters touched down north of Little Rock and tore an 80-mile path through the area. At least 17 people have died.

» E-Mail This

ON THE AIR
We're on autopilot.

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4