National News

My First Job: Rosie the Riveter

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-06-09 10:25

Marian Sousa didn’t have to look very hard for her first job.

The U.S. government hired her right out of a drafting class at UC Berkeley and Sousa became a draftsman at Shipyard Number Three during WWII.

“Actually, I was 17 and underage so I had to kind of fib,” Sousa says.  

Commonly referred to as “Rosie the Riveter(s)” because of Norman Rockwell’s iconic painting of the same name, women who worked in American military factories were an integral part of wartime efforts.

Norman Rockwell's ''Rosie the Riveter''

For Sousa, a shipyard at peak operation was an exciting place to be.

“It was so busy you could actually see the energy in the air, everybody with a purpose,” Sousa says. 

But there was a somber element to her first job too. The troop transports she was helping to build were taking many men to a war they might not come back from.

“But we knew they were going to bring them back and they did. On those ships, on our ships.”

Sousa and other women who worked on the home front were recently invited to the White House and thanked for their service. Sousa says she even got a kiss on the cheek from the President. The attention Sousa has received on account of her first job has come as a surprise to her.

 “I never expected to be recognized, not only just locally, but by the President of the United States. I never, ever, ever expected that to happen. But it did, and I’m sky high.”

My First Job: Rosie the Riveter

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-06-09 10:25

Marian Sousa didn’t have to look very hard for her first job.

The U.S. government hired her right out of a drafting class at UC Berkeley and Sousa became a draftsman at Shipyard Number Three during WWII.

“Actually, I was 17 and underage so I had to kind of fib,” Sousa says.  

Commonly referred to as “Rosie the Riveter(s)” because of Norman Rockwell’s iconic painting of the same name, women who worked in American military factories were an integral part of wartime efforts.

Norman Rockwell's ''Rosie the Riveter''

For Sousa, a shipyard at peak operation was an exciting place to be.

“It was so busy you could actually see the energy in the air, everybody with a purpose,” Sousa says. 

But there was a somber element to her first job too. The troop transports she was helping to build were taking many men to a war they might not come back from.

“But we knew they were going to bring them back and they did. On those ships, on our ships.”

Sousa and other women who worked on the home front were recently invited to the White House and thanked for their service. Sousa says she even got a kiss on the cheek from the President. The attention Sousa has received on account of her first job has come as a surprise to her.

 “I never expected to be recognized, not only just locally, but by the President of the United States. I never, ever, ever expected that to happen. But it did, and I’m sky high.”

A Gender Revolution Hits The Streets, Two Wheels At A Time

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 10:00

On one ride, a guy knocked one of the girls off her bike. But it didn't discourage these Afghan teens from cruising around Kabul every Friday and challenging the view that woman shouldn't bike.

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Using Obscure Law, Cleveland Residents Seek Arrest Of Police Officers

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 09:59

The residents want two police officers arrested over the killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was playing with a pellet gun in a public park last November.

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As American As Iced Tea: A Brief, Sometimes Boozy History

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 09:57

At least as early as Colonial times, Americans were drinking iced tea, though early alcohol-laden recipes had more in common with the cocktail from Long Island than the stuff sold by Lipton.

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Guess Which State Has The Best High School Graduation Rate?

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 09:08

The national graduation rate has hit a remarkable 81 percent. Why the steep rise in recent years? Exhibit A: Iowa.

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Hogwarts Hops The Pond: Rowling Reveals U.S. Version Of Wizards' School

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 09:01

In a series of tweets with fans, Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling confirmed that Americans have their own version of the legendary school of witchcraft and wizardry.

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Hundreds March In McKinney's Streets To Protest Police Action

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 09:00

The protest came after the town's police department said that it's investigating Friday's incident. An officer who forced a teenage girl to the ground and briefly drew his gun is on leave.

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Luminaries Across Political Spectrum Filed Support Letters For Gen. Petraeus

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 08:23

In letters of support, Republicans and Democrats pleaded with a judge to keep Gen. David Petraeus from jail, after he pleaded guilty to revealing government secrets to his biographer.

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To Beat Insomnia, Try Therapy For The Underlying Cause Instead Of Pills

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 08:19

A review of the medical evidence finds that therapy can break the cycle of chronic sleeplessness by addressing the anxieties that cause many people to stay awake.

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Virginia Court Is Ordered To Reconsider Injunction In Sweet Briar College Case

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 08:16

The legal battle over Sweet Briar's fate has been fast-moving — the private women's school is slated to close on Aug. 25.

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Here's How Inflation Has Eroded American Workers' Overtime Eligibility

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 08:06

The Obama administration might soon make millions of workers newly eligible for overtime, but experts disagree over how the new rules should look.

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The Battles Of A Civil War Re-Enactress

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 06:33

Refused at first as a re-enactor, J.R. Hardman turned to historic, real-life pioneers for inspiration.

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Vincent Bugliosi, Manson Prosecutor And 'Helter Skelter' Author, Dies

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 06:01

After the 1969 murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others thrust Bugliosi into the spotlight, he won convictions against Charles Manson and his followers.

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Federal Judge Orders Release Of Last 'Angola 3' Prisoner

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 04:26

Albert Woodfox has spent four decades in solitary confinement after he was convicted in the stabbing death of a prison guard. Woodfox's conviction was overturned.

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High School Graduation Rates: The Good, The Bad And The Ambiguous

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 03:49

From Texas to New Jersey, we found a mix of approaches: questionable quick fixes and powerful long-term strategies.

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PODCAST: Cutting remittance fees in times of need

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-06-09 03:00

With GM's shareholder meeting taking place today, there's news that the head of Fiat Chrysler has been shopping around for hedge fund partners to put up money to encourage a merger between the two companies. John Stoll, bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal in Detroit, joins us with more. We'll also take a look at the JOLTS report out today. And we'll talk about how cutting remittance fees after disasters like the recent earthquake in Nepal could be an effective form of post-disaster aid.

PODCAST: Cutting remittance fees in times of need

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-06-09 03:00

With GM's shareholder meeting taking place today, there's news that the head of Fiat Chrysler has been shopping around for hedge fund partners to put up money to encourage a merger between the two companies. John Stoll, bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal in Detroit, joins us with more. We'll also take a look at the JOLTS report out today. And we'll talk about how cutting remittance fees after disasters like the recent earthquake in Nepal could be an effective form of post-disaster aid.

Dennis Hastert To Appear In A Chicago Courthouse For Arraignment

NPR News - Tue, 2015-06-09 02:58

Hastert was indicted by a federal grand jury in May over allegations of paying hush money and lying to the FBI. This would be his first public appearance since the charges became public.

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College is only one option after Oyler School

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2015-06-09 02:00

At a recent college fair at Oyler School in Cincinnati, Ohio, students from the seventh through 12th grades filed through the gym. A few students cluster around representatives from a local community college and liberal arts school, but it's the table for the Paul Mitchell cosmetology school that's mobbed.

It may be the free samples and coupons for haircuts, but this year Oyler is making a bigger effort to promote trade schools. When Paul Mitchell admissions leader Christina Matthews was in high school, she says college was the obvious next step.

"I did not know about vocational programs," she says. "I kind of wonder if those options would have been available, how my path would have been different."

At Oyler, college has never been taken for granted. It's only been a high school for nine years. Many of its mostly low-income students will be the first in their families to finish high school, let alone consider a four-year degree. Oyler has been working hard to build a college-going culture. College graduates tend to make more money during their careers, and economists say more and more jobs of the future will require degrees.

Still, teacher Kelly Thomas says college isn't always the best fit. The school has adapted its annual college fair to recognize other paths.

"It's not so much about, 'You have to get a four-year degree,'" she says. "We're trying to make it, 'What is going to make you happy, and what kind of education does that require?'"

Sometimes, a short-term certificate can go a long way. Last summer, one Oyler graduate spent just five weeks training to be a nursing and patient care assistant. Instead of making $8 an hour in an entry-level restaurant job, Thomas says she got hired at a nursing home making $13 an hour with benefits.

That student has a child of her own, so like many at Oyler, she needed to start working right away. Others, like current senior Nathan Meyer, 18, just aren't that into school.

"I don't want to spend all my money to go somewhere that I don't feel comfortable and I just don't want to go," Meyer says. "I feel like there's plenty of other things you can do to make money."

At the end of the fair, Meyer and his fellow students gather on the roof to release balloons representing their career goals. He's thinking about joining the Navy, or maybe training to be an electrician, but most importantly, he wants a steady job.

Of the 45 graduates from Oyler this year, more than half plan to attend a two-year or four-year college. About 38 percent are undecided, or plan to go straight into the workforce. Seven percent are headed to trade school.

Additional reporting by Mary Wiltenburg.

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