National News

A Snapshot Of The Spike In Inequality, As Seen From Dayton

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 12:14

A new report released by the U.S. Conference of Mayors has found that jobs gained since the recession pay dramatically less than the jobs lost during the recession. To comment on the findings, Nan Whaley, mayor of Dayton, Ohio, speaks with Melissa Block.

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Has the Affordable Care Act changed your life?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-08-11 12:10

We want to know whether or not the Affordable Care Act has changed your life in a negative or positive way.

If it has, tell us how by emailing us or tweeting us @MarketplaceWknd.

We'll be talking about it all week online, and will feature some of your stories in next week's show.

WATCH: Rescue Mission In Iraq Leaves Everyone Onboard In Tears

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 12:03

New footage shows dramatic operations to help people stranded in mountains in northern Iraq. As people flee militants, the Pentagon says its airstrikes have slowed but not stopped the Islamic State.

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'Shark Week' Fuels Shark-Meat Feeding Frenzy At Restaurants

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 11:30

The craze to embrace all things shark during Discovery's "Shark Week" in August is exploding onto menus. But the hype doesn't hide the fact that many of these creatures are endangered.

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Phil Hamm's no billionaire, but he's got something to say about oil

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-08-11 10:28

The oil boom has brought all sorts of changes to western North Dakota. Billionaire Harold Hamm has had a big hand in it.  His company, Continental Resources, is the biggest oil producer there.

Then there's Phil Hamm, who moved to Williston, North Dakota, before the oil industry arrived. He had a few things to say about the changes he's seen, when Todd Melby interviewed for his series "Black Gold Boom."

Todd Melby's series, "Black Gold Boom," is an initiative of Prairie Public and the Association for Independents in Radio.

Why 'Apple University' teaches new hires Picasso

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-08-11 10:26

Steve Jobs established Apple University to teach employees about Apple’s history and culture. Although the courses are not required, Apple’s new recruits usually do enroll.

“This training program is a lot more extensive than pretty much every other corporate training program that I've heard of,” says Brian Chen, technology reporter at The New York Times.

One class instructor compared the 11 lithographs of Pablo Picasso’s “The Bull” to the way Apple builds their devices, as a way to teach the class how to communicate at Apple.

“They like to start out with an idea and whittle it down as much as possible, until it speaks just clearly enough for the consumer,” says Chen. “It’s just a general way that they try to teach employees to think about communicating.”

Listen to the full interview in the audio player above.

People Wonder: 'If They Gunned Me Down,' What Photo Would Media Use?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 10:17

A killing in suburban St. Louis leads people to tweet "dueling" photos of themselves – one where the subject looks wholesome, and another where the same person might seem like a troublemaker.

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Bevel: Beyond the 'ethnic' aisle

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-08-11 10:15

Walker and Company CEO Tristan Walker had a hard time shaving. When he was 15, he tried a multi-blade razor and woke up with bumps and rashes on his face the next morning.

So, in 2013, Walker founded a company to solve problems in the health and beauty space for the African American community. Their first product is called Bevel, a shaving system designed specifically for men with coarse and curly hair.

“It’s razor bumps and razor burn. It’s a problem that 80 percent of black men and black women have, and it’s a problem that 30 percent of other races have.”

Bevel works through a multi-step process. You start by applying oil and then shaving cream with a brush, using a single blade razor, and finishing with a moisturizer. The starter kit costs $59.95, and 90-day replenishment kits cost $30 each. That’s a total of $150 for the products.

Tristan Walker knows this is a high price for a shaving kit:

“I reflect back on my experience of going to a retail shop, having to go to the ethnic aisle that’s not really an aisle, that’s really a shelf. Then I have to reach to the bottom of that shelf for a package that’s dirty. Like, that entire second-class citizen experience… it’s not great. Considering how much money we spend on these things, how much need we have for products that work, I think having a respect for the customer is incredibly important.”

Listen to the full conversation in the audio player above.

Someday, Afghanistan Will Get A New President

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 09:28

The presidential election has dragged on for months and it's still not clear who the winner is or when he will take office. NPR's Sean Carberry takes a firsthand look at the slow-motion vote count.

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My money story: Why Chuck Eggert bought the farm

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-08-11 09:02

Twenty years ago, there were just under 2,000 farmers markets in the U.S. Now, according to the USDA, there are more than 8,000. 

That’s been great news for many farmers, including Chuck Eggert. He’s the Founder and President of Pacific Foods of Oregon. The operation is one of the most successful operations in the Northwest. Ebbert talked to us about some of the keys to that success, including the need for good soil.

“When you look at conventional soils, there’s very little organic matter, so when you go to pick it up, it’s almost like a dirt clod,” Eggert says.

The key to finding good soil, he adds, is to look for animals scavenging.

“Because they know there’s seeds and bugs there that they can live off of.”

Click the play button above to hear about Chuck Eggert and life on the farm.

NCAA Moves To Appeal Judge's Ruling On Compensating Athletes

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 07:58

Current and former students had sued on antitrust grounds over the commercial use of their names and images. The NCAA says it will appeal — a path that has brought it success in the past.

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More Questions Than Answers In Deadly Tony Stewart Crash

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 07:14

While NASCAR's Stewart has frequently raced in sprint car events over the years, the sideline events have given him trouble: a 2013 crash left another driver with a broken back.

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No Roads Lead To Iquitos But This Med Student Is Glad He Made The Trip

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 07:03

He came as part of a volunteer team. What he finds in this Peruvian city of half a million is that the common hernia can ruin a man's life — and be easily fixed by a volunteer doctor.

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Trial Of Alleged German Autobahn Shooter Begins

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 05:36

The suspect is accused of firing more than 700 shots at other vehicles on German highways over five years. A three-judge panel will determine if he should face attempted murder charges.

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New Leader Of Iraq Is Nominated, But Maliki Insists He'll Stay In Office

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 05:07

"Vice President Joe Biden called Iraqi Prime Minister-designate Haider al-Abadi to congratulate him on his nomination," the White House says.

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Panic, Pouring Rain, A Ray Of Sun: Reporting On Ebola In Sierra Leone

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 04:19

They've stopped shaking hands and hugging each other. They keep buckets of chlorinated water at the door. And they're praying to defeat "the evil one" — Ebola.

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When Applying For Federal Aid, 'Cross Your Fingers And Hope'

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 04:08

Students are taking out loans with little understanding of the consequences. The bewildering federal aid process doesn't help.

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St. Louis-Area Rally For Teen Killed By Police Turns Violent

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 03:43

Police and witnesses agree the teen did not have a gun and that a third person was also involved; beyond that, the details of Michael Brown's death are in dispute.

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Israel, Hamas Agree To More Talks As Truce Appears To Hold

NPR News - Mon, 2014-08-11 03:42

But the two sides appeared no closer to a settlement to end the fighting in the Gaza Strip that has left nearly 2,000 Palestinians, mostly civilians, and 67 Israelis, mostly soldiers, dead.

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PODCAST: Money in the meteorites

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-08-11 03:00

Amazon has taken on a new opponent: Captain America. Try to pre-order a DVD or Blu-Ray of "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," and you'll come up empty. More on why the movie is the latest casualty in a pricing dispute between Amazon and Disney. Plus, Brussels, home to the European Parliament, is seeing lots of lobbyists from the U.S. tech industry. They've descended to advocate against new online privacy legislation. And right now, the perseid meteor shower is going on -- The spectacle of shooting stars has long brought a sense of wonder to those who stay up to watch it. It's also brought cash...Sort of.

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