National News

Why Is This Fisherman Selling Threatened Bluefin Tuna For $2.99 A Pound?

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 10:56

That low price doesn't reflect the true state of Pacific bluefin: Scientists say it's in deep trouble. But fishermen who catch it say they're just trying to make a living — and obeying the law.

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How 'Diet Gurus' Hook Us With Religion Veiled In Science

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 10:43

From Paleo to vegan to raw, nutrition gurus package their advice as sound science. But peel the studies away and you'll find timeless myths and superstitions of religion.

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Ron Moody, Who Delighted Audiences As Fagin In 'Oliver!' Dies

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 09:33

Throughout his career, Moody played a variety of parts on stage and screen. But he said that in the villainous Fagin, he'd found the role of a lifetime.

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In Its First Crowdfunding Case, FTC Goes After Board Game Kickstarter

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 09:29

The FTC alleges that Erik Chevalier collected $122,000 from more than 1,000 backers and used the money on personal expenses.

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How An Economist Helped Patients Find The Right Kidney Donors

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 08:35

If you've got a life-threatening medical condition, your first call might not be to an economist. But Alvin Roth used a theory about matching markets to help connect kidney patients and donors.

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Rupert Murdoch Poised To Step Down As CEO Of 21st Century Fox

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 08:24

His son James is expected to become head of the company, while Murdoch will stay on as chairman of the boards of both 21st Century Fox and News Corp.

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Virginia Teen Pleads Guilty To Supporting ISIS Over Social Media

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 07:45

Ali Shukri Amin, 17, admitted to showing the terrorist group how to use virtual currencies to mask funding. Amin could face up to 15 years in prison.

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Joyce Carol Oates On Dinosaur-Killer Tweet: 'My Tweets Are Meant To Be Funny'

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 07:18

"So barbaric that this should still be allowed," Joyce Carol Oates wrote, in a tweet that was taken quite literally by many online readers.

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If Obamacare Subsidies Disappear, States And Congress Will Bear Burden For Fix

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 07:07

More than 6 million people could lose income-related subsidies if the Supreme Court strikes them down for coverage bought through the federal exchange, HealthCare.gov.

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From Solitary To The Streets: Released Inmates Get Little Help

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 07:00

An investigation by NPR and The Marshall Project found that many states don't keep track of how many inmates are released directly from solitary confinement without any transition or supervision.

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Ornette Coleman, Jazz Iconoclast, Dies At 85

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 06:33

The American jazz saxophonist and composer who liberated jazz from conventional harmony, tonality, structure and expectation, died Thursday of cardiac arrest in Manhattan at age 85.

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Trio Of Astronauts Return To Earth After Record-Breaking ISS Mission

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 06:28

Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti surpassed a space endurance record for a female spacefarer.

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Dirty Dancing In The Early 1900s

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 06:23

Scandalous swirls like the Bunny Hug, Turkey Trot and Grizzly Bear may have even scared President-elect Woodrow Wilson.

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Reports: Christopher Lee, Star In 'Dracula,' 'Star Wars,' Dies

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 04:56

Lee's career was varied and vast: He made his name as Dracula for decades, but then went on to play roles in Hollywood blockbusters like Lord of the Rings. Lee was 93 years old.

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Authorities Beef Up Search For Killers Who Escaped New York Prison

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 04:39

An area not far from the prison where David Sweat and Richard Matt broke out last weekend appears to be a focus of police scrutiny, but officials were also looking in neighboring Vermont.

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PODCAST: Costco cars

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-06-11 03:00

There is news today that retail sales went up 1.2 percent in May. More on that. Plus, Costco is closing in on becoming the biggest car retailer in the nation, thanks to a policy of selling cars at a fixed, discounted price. And no, they don’t come in packs of two. We'll also talk to Univision’s Leon Krauze about the Mexican midterm elections this past weekend.

China Sentences Former Security Chief To Life In Prison For Corruption

NPR News - Thu, 2015-06-11 02:44

Zhou Yongkang became the highest-ranking official to be convicted in President Xi Jinping's campaign against corruption. Zhou was accused of taking bribes and leaking state secrets.

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Another Costco bonus for members: discount cars

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-06-11 02:00

Nearly 50 million Americans pay an annual fee of $55 to $110 a year at Costco so they can stock up on giant packages of steeply discounted paper towels or even bargain-priced jewelry.

But a growing number of Costco members are also turning to the company to score a ride. Costco has become a major player in the world of car sales. The retailer says it helped move about 400,000 cars last year.

“Costco is essentially acting as a middle man,” says Jeff Schuster, senior vice president of forecasting at LMC Automotive. “They are working with the manufacturers to bring in vehicles and essentially set a price for the vehicle.”

Costco negotiates price discounts that can save members $1,000 on average.

“So their members then don't have to haggle,” Schuster says.

John Rand tracks Costco at the research firm Kantar Retail. He says Costco offers special opportunities like brokered car purchases and even vacations because it’s focused on growing and retaining its membership base. Rand says 80 percent of its net revenue comes from member fees.

“Costco is in many ways not really a retailer," he says. "They tell you what they are: they're a club ... and as a club their mission is constantly to provide something extraordinary to members.”

The virtual doctor will see you now

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-06-11 02:00

Walgreens, the nation’s largest retail pharmacy chain, has announced plans to provide virtual medical exams to patients in 25 states by the end of the year.

The news is part of a larger trend of giving patients less expensive alternatives to a doctor's office visit.

Patients will be able to use the Walgreens mobile app to access doctors who can then write prescriptions for common ailments such as, say, pinkeye or a sinus infection.

Jon Linkous is CEO of the non-profit American Telemedicine Association. He says the growing trend will increase healthcare access and provide greater convenience.

“Patients who are now customers can look at this application and avoid the long waits that it might take for them to get an appointment at a primary care doctor as well as having to go into a waiting room filled with other sick people,” Linkous says.

Walmart, CVS, and RiteAid are exploring plans to launch their own virtual clinics, but there are also risks. That is according to Andy Haig, director of e-Health at the University of Michigan.

“What's most important that people need to realize is that primary care medicine is a book that is about 20,000 pages wide, and there is a reason for that,” Haig says.

This is a business model, it’s not a quality model," he says. "A few major lawsuits may change things for the better, and I'm hoping that these large companies are smart enough to play the odds and be sure they have good quality and they place limits on their treatment.”

UnitedHealthcare and Anthem are also making plans to roll out telemedicine services by next year.

The virtual doctor will see you now

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-06-11 02:00

Walgreens, the nation’s largest retail pharmacy chain, has announced plans to provide virtual medical exams to patients in 25 states by the end of the year.

The news is part of a larger trend of giving patients less expensive alternatives to a doctor's office visit.

Patients will be able to use the Walgreens mobile app to access doctors who can then write prescriptions for common ailments such as, say, pinkeye or a sinus infection.

Jon Linkous is CEO of the non-profit American Telemedicine Association. He says the growing trend will increase healthcare access and provide greater convenience.

“Patients who are now customers can look at this application and avoid the long waits that it might take for them to get an appointment at a primary care doctor as well as having to go into a waiting room filled with other sick people,” Linkous says.

Walmart, CVS, and RiteAid are exploring plans to launch their own virtual clinics, but there are also risks. That is according to Andy Haig, director of e-Health at the University of Michigan.

“What's most important that people need to realize is that primary care medicine is a book that is about 20,000 pages wide, and there is a reason for that,” Haig says.

This is a business model, it’s not a quality model," he says. "A few major lawsuits may change things for the better, and I'm hoping that these large companies are smart enough to play the odds and be sure they have good quality and they place limits on their treatment.”

UnitedHealthcare and Anthem are also making plans to roll out telemedicine services by next year.

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