National News

Last Words From Cockpit May Be Clue To Jet's Disappearance

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 04:18

There's still no sign of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which went missing on March 8. Was the informal "good night" from the jet a sign it had been taken over or that the crew is involved?

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America's game of chicken

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-17 03:20
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 04:06 Stacey Vanek Smith

Ariane Daguin demonstrates the proper way to carve a chicken. Daguin is the CEO of D'Artagnan, a company that supplies organic, free range chickens to grocery stores and restaurants.

Where’s the beef?

As a nation, we might really need to know that. For the first time in more than a century, Americans are eating more chicken than beef. Why is poultry taking flight?

"People are more conscious about health, and so they will eat red meat a little less often and white meat more often," says Ariane Daguin, CEO of D'Artagnan, which sells organic, free-range chicken to high end restaurants and grocery stores all over the country. Her business is growing 15 percent per year, a lot of that is thanks to rising chicken demand.

But a lot of the reason for the rising popularity of chicken has to do with beef.

"The real trade-off that we’re seeing in consumption is escalation in poultry and decline in beef," says Don Close, cattle economist with Rabo AgriFinance. Beef prices have skyrocketed and are expected to jump by as much as 15 percent this year. (Here's a look at why that's happening)

"We saw pretty heavy substitution on the part of consumers, substituting ground beef for ground chicken and thereby driving up the prices of those products," says Ricky Volpe, economist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Chicken prices are expected to rise by about 10 percent this year. Even still, chicken will remain far cheaper than beef and pork. 

But even if beef prices come back down, Ariane Daguin doesn’t think Americans will go back to beef.

"It is not a trend," she says. "Trend means there is an end to it. There is no end to good food. People in America are more and more conscious that you are what you eat."

And right now, that’s chicken.

 

Marketplace Morning Report for Wednesday, March 26, 2014 Stacey Vanek Smith

Ariane Daguin prepares a chicken stew dish with one of her new Green Circle chickens, which have a vegetable-heavy diet.

Stacey Vanek Smith

Americans are eating more chicken than beef for the first time in a century. 

Stacey Vanek Smith

Ariane Daguin demonstrates the proper way to carve a chicken. Daguin is the CEO of D'Artagnan, a company that supplies free range, organic chickens to restaurants and grocery stores all over the country. Daguin's business is growing 15% a year.

by Stacey Vanek SmithPodcast Title: America's Game of ChickenStory Type: FeatureSyndication: SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond: No

Russia Recognizes Independent Crimea; U.S. And EU 'Stand Firm' With Ukraine

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 03:15

President Obama says the U.S. will not recognize Crimea's moves to split from Ukraine. In Moscow, President Vladimir Putin signs an order recognizing Crimea as an independent state.

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Clothing Retailer Lands End To Split From Sears

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 02:25

Lands End, the outdoor clothing retailer, will spin off from Sears Holdings Corp. next month and operate as a stand-alone, publicly traded company.

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PODCAST: Markets look past Ukraine

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:41

European Union foreign ministers today agreed to a package of measures to respond to moves to annex the Crimean region to Russia.  Twenty-one people will find their financial assets frozen in Europe and face bans on travel. Just who is on that list of 21 has not yet been released, but the White House just now named 11 people, targeted for sanctions, seven Russians and four Ukrainians.  And yet the financial markets seem less-than-perturbed by the news. How is it that investors can so easily shrug off a big global political event?

Plus, a new industry has sprung up in recent years: Websites that post nothing but mugshots. They're popular — people like to see other people in embarrassing moments — except with those who have their mugshots posted. In Chicago, the sites also wore out their welcome with the county sheriff. They seemed to be crashing his website. Some of them look like shakedown operations: Mugshots.com has a big "unpublish mugshot"  link right at the top of its homepage — for fees that start at $400. Late last year, those sites seemed to be crashing the Cook County Sheriff’s inmate locator site.  Automated systems were trying to suck the photos up faster than the county’s server could respond. Law enforcement across the country are trying to respond -- but with mixed results.

What deportations mean for U.S. businesses

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

Last week, President Barack Obama announced a review of his deportation policy, to sighs of, "here we go again" from the business community.

Business groups that support immigration reform say what they really need is the certainty an immigration bill would bring, so they don't have to worry about workers they thought were legal getting deported. "There's concern about, what would happen if they lost those workers someday.  Because if you're a small business owner your workers are your business," says Tamar Jacoby, president of ImmigrationWorks USA.

Jacoby says the deportation review could actually hurt chances for immigration reform this year by complicating already-tense negotiations between congressional Republicans and the White House.

EU Rejects Crimean Vote, Weighs Sanctions Against Russia

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

Germany and its European allies react to Sunday's referendum in Crimea. NPR's Soraya Sarhardi Nelson joins us from Berlin.

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Crimeans Vote To Leave Ukraine, Join Russia

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

Crimeans voted overwhelmingly on Sunday to leave Ukraine and join Russia. Morning Edition checks in with NPR's Gregory Warner in Simferopol and Eleanor Beardsley in Kiev for the latest.

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Unions Mobilize To Fight Political Novice In Illinois' GOP Primary

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

Republicans hope to take the governor's mansion in Democratic Illinois. If Bruce Rauner wins the GOP nomination as predicted Tuesday, he'll take on incumbent Pat Quinn, who has lost popularity.

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Balancing College Dreams With The Reality Of Finances

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

As part of a monthlong look at how American families are paying for college, David Greene talks to a senior and his mother about applying to colleges and waiting to hear about financial aid.

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Negotiators Gather In Vienna For Talks On Iran's Nukes

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

With the clock ticking on a six-month deal to limit Iran's nuclear program in exchange for easing economic sanctions, negotiators from Iran and world powers meet this week in Vienna.

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Syrian Conflict Marches Into Fourth Year

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

The Syrian uprising started three years ago this week with protests and eventually a military crackdown that led to all-out civil war. More than 130,000 people have died.

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Investigation Into Missing Malaysian Jet Expands

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

The search for the Malaysian Airlines plane that went missing more than a week ago has expanded as officials still have little idea what happened to it.

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Google Glass: Coming Soon To A Campaign Trail Near You

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

Google Glass is still in the testing phase and still rather expensive, but that hasn't stopped political professionals from looking for ways Google Glass can become a powerful tool for campaigns.

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Does Teaching Kids To Get 'Gritty' Help Them Get Ahead?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 01:00

Education circles are abuzz with a new concept: that resilience and persistence are just as important as intelligence to predicting student success and achievement. But can "grit" actually be taught?

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Justmugshots.com and the business of embarrassment

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-17 00:19

A new industry has sprung up in recent years: Websites that post nothing but mugshots. They're popular -- people like to see other people in embarrassing moments — except with those who have their mugshots posted. In Chicago, the sites also wore out their welcome with the county sheriff. They seemed to be crashing his website. 

Around 4 o'clock on a recent Tuesday afternoon, the assembly line at Cook County jail gets started with processing inmates. In the next few hours, 263 people would pass through here.

At the photo station, a sheriff's deputy pulled up each man’s record on his computer, and snapped a couple of pictures to add.

Within hours, the photos were up on the Sheriff’s inmate locator website. Where they get picked up by for-profit mugshot websites: mugshots.com, bustedmugshots.com, justmugshots.com, and others.

Some of them look like shakedown operations: Mugshots.com has a big “unpublish mugshot” link right at the top of its homepage — for fees that start at $400.

Late last year, those sites seemed to be crashing the Cook County Sheriff’s inmate locator site.  Automated systems were trying to suck the photos up faster than the county’s server could respond.

“It is a very important part of our site,” says Ben Breit, the Sheriff’s communication director, who runs the website.  “I would argue that it is the most important part of our site.”

People use the inmate locator to find friends and relatives who have been arrested, he says.  “That is also the main conduit through which family and friends can register to visit those people.” 

The Sheriff solved the crashing problem, by installing a “captcha” — a prompt forcing users to type in a randomly-chosen bunch of letters and numbers, to prove they’re human. 

However, the websites still have the pictures.

Some states, including Illinois, have passed laws trying to outlaw the shakedowns. People whose mugshots got posted have filed lawsuits.  

The results have been uneven. Mugshot websites lean on the same legal principles as news media: Access to public information and the freedom to publish it.

Newspapers run mugshots too. Matthew Waite, now a journalism professor at the University of Nebraska, built one of the first galleries when he worked at the Tampa Bay Times. He says the traffic to those pages was huge.

“It’s hard to argue that people aren’t interested in these,” he says.  “But the question is, how much can you exploit that interest for profit?  Is putting advertising on those pages untoward? That seems less of a problem to me than putting people’s mugshots online and then charging to have it taken down.”

Even the shakedown schemes are hard to outlaw, says Jeff Hermes, director of the Digital Media Law Center at Harvard.

“These activities are morally reprehensible,” he says. “But when you try to dig down to the level of what’s actually illegal, it turns out to be quite elusive.”

What has worked is shame. Google had inadvertently fueled the extortion racket: When you searched someone’s name, any mugshots showed up as top results:  A big incentive to pay for removal.  

Last fall, Google tweaked its algorithm. Mugshot results got exiled to the back pages.  Around the same time, when the New York Times did a big story on the mugshot racket, payment services like PayPal and American Express promised to stop doing business with mugshot-takedown companies.

Today, a lot of the sites no longer offer removal services. The exception, mugshots.com, is based in the British West Indies.

Justmugshots.com and the business of embarassment

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-17 00:19

A new industry has sprung up in recent years: Websites that post nothing but mugshots. They're popular -- people like to see other people in embarrassing moments — except with those who have their mugshots posted. In Chicago, the sites also wore out their welcome with the county sheriff. They seemed to be crashing his website. 

Around 4 o'clock on a recent Tuesday afternoon, the assembly line at Cook County jail gets started with processing inmates. In the next few hours, 263 people would pass through here.

At the photo station, a sheriff's deputy pulled up each man’s record on his computer, and snapped a couple of pictures to add.

Within hours, the photos were up on the Sheriff’s inmate locator website. Where they get picked up by for-profit mugshot websites: mugshots.com, bustedmugshots.com, justmugshots.com, and others.

Some of them look like shakedown operations: Mugshots.com has a big “unpublish mugshot” link right at the top of its homepage — for fees that start at $400.

Late last year, those sites seemed to be crashing the Cook County Sheriff’s inmate locator site.  Automated systems were trying to suck the photos up faster than the county’s server could respond.

“It is a very important part of our site,” says Ben Breit, the Sheriff’s communication director, who runs the website.  “I would argue that it is the most important part of our site.”

People use the inmate locator to find friends and relatives who have been arrested, he says.  “That is also the main conduit through which family and friends can register to visit those people.” 

The Sheriff solved the crashing problem, by installing a “captcha” — a prompt forcing users to type in a randomly-chosen bunch of letters and numbers, to prove they’re human. 

However, the websites still have the pictures.

Some states, including Illinois, have passed laws trying to outlaw the shakedowns. People whose mugshots got posted have filed lawsuits.  

The results have been uneven. Mugshot websites lean on the same legal principles as news media: Access to public information and the freedom to publish it.

Newspapers run mugshots too. Matthew Waite, now a journalism professor at the University of Nebraska, built one of the first galleries when he worked at the Tampa Bay Times. He says the traffic to those pages was huge.

“It’s hard to argue that people aren’t interested in these,” he says.  “But the question is, how much can you exploit that interest for profit?  Is putting advertising on those pages untoward? That seems less of a problem to me than putting people’s mugshots online and then charging to have it taken down.”

Even the shakedown schemes are hard to outlaw, says Jeff Hermes, director of the Digital Media Law Center at Harvard.

“These activities are morally reprehensible,” he says. “But when you try to dig down to the level of what’s actually illegal, it turns out to be quite elusive.”

What has worked is shame. Google had inadvertently fueled the extortion racket: When you searched someone’s name, any mugshots showed up as top results:  A big incentive to pay for removal.  

Last fall, Google tweaked its algorithm. Mugshot results got exiled to the back pages.  Around the same time, when the New York Times did a big story on the mugshot racket, payment services like PayPal and American Express promised to stop doing business with mugshot-takedown companies.

Today, a lot of the sites no longer offer removal services. The exception, mugshots.com, is based in the British West Indies.

Doctors Use 3-D Printing To Help A Baby Breathe

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 00:17

Garrett Peterson was born with a defective windpipe and every day he struggled to breathe. Now, thanks to a 3-D printer, his windpipe has been strengthened and Garrett should soon breathe normally.

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Obama Says U.S. Will Never Recognize Crimea's Secession Vote

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-17 00:10

A day after Crimeans voted to secede from Ukraine, the U.S. and its Western allies were expected to announce sanctions against Russia.

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Paying For College: No Easy Answers For Many Families

NPR News - Sun, 2014-03-16 23:59

After adjusting for inflation, the cost of tuition more than tripled between 1973 and 2013. That reality has been forcing more and more students to take on staggering debts.

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