Alaska News

Rep. Guttenberg Looks To Jumpstart Fairbanks LNG

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 16:29

State Representative David Guttenberg wants to jumpstart Fairbanks’ conversion to natural gas heating. The state is pursuing a public private project to process North Slope gas and truck it to Fairbanks, but Gutenberg says it faces a familiar problem.

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Categories: Alaska News

Fairbanks Rains Approach Record Levels

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 16:28

Scattered rain showers are in the Fairbanks area forecast, and any precipitation that falls will add to local totals that have Fairbanks on track to continue breaking wet weather records.

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The last rain event Monday, a thunderstorm that brought heavy downpours, boosted July precipitation even further above normal.

The National Weather Service reports that Monday’s thunderstorm dropped 1.13 inches at Fairbanks International where the agency takes its official measurements. Meteorologist Ryan Metzger says the rain moved Fairbanks up the list of Fairbanks rainiest Julys.

“So far for the month of July, we’ve had 4.49 inches, and that’s the fourth-highest amount on record for the month of July,” Metzger said. “The wettest, for reference, is 5.96 inches, and that was set in 2003.”

Metzger says Fairbanks normally receives 2.16 inches of rain in July. Fairbanks just logged its rainiest June, and the combined months of June and July have already bested the previous 2-month high mark. Metzger says there is a chance of breaking the June, July, August record as well.

“The record for summer season is 11.59 inches,” Metzger said. “So, right now, we’re sitting at 8.05 inches. So, we’d have to have a couple more big events for that to happen.”

Metzger says nothing like that is currently in the forecast.

Categories: Alaska News

‘Among Wolves’ Details Researcher’s Lifelong Passion

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 16:27

The University of Alaska Press recently published a book detailing one biologist’s lifelong effort to chronicle the lives of wolves that live inside the boundary of Denali Park and Preserve.

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Marybeth Holleman was a friend of Doctor Gordon Haber, who was killed in a plane crash in Denali in 2009. “I was just struck by his incredible knowledge and his passion for his research subject, wolves,” she said. Holleman spent the last few years digging through forty years’ worth of Haber’s field notes, journals and even tweets. She compiled Haber’s work into a book, “Among Wolves”.

Holleman will present her book as part of a Summer Speaker Series at the Geophysical Institute on the UAF campus tonight at 7 p.m.

Marybeth Holleman first heard Gordon Haber talk about wolves and his research thirty years ago.
“He just retained that sense of wonder about his subject that really makes other people light up about it. It really gets you excited about it too. That was my first memory of Gordon,” she said.

Holleman soon became friends with Haber. He has been described as ‘cantankerous’ and ‘prickly.’ He first came to Alaska in the 60’s for the same reason many twenty-somethings do: the wilderness. Later, he became an outspoken biologist, questioning the state’s wildlife management methods, but Holleman says that’s because he was also one of the few wolf experts in Alaska.

“People don’t like people who say things they don’t want to hear and Gordon had an unassailable experiential authority in wolf behavior and wolf family structure,” Holleman said. “So he drew some conclusions from his research and a lot of people in Alaska don’t want to hear them because it goes directly against a lot of the predator control and wildlife management that goes on in the state.”

Haber spent his career monitoring the wolf packs of Denali National Park and Preserve.

“His primary conclusion was that you can’t manage wolves by the numbers because the functional unit of a wolf isn’t one wolf, it’s a family group of wolves. That social group, that dynamic is the core,” Holleman said. “So if you say ‘I’ve got so many wolves I’ve got to kill,’ that’s not really the way to manage them. The way to manage them is to look at that family structure and manage them that way.”
Holleman’s book outlines Haber’s other discoveries. For example, why DO wolves howl?

“Wolves howl for a lot of reasons. Wolves howl to let each other know where they are. They also howl simply for the joy of it. Sometimes they would howl with the plane engine overhead as sort of a resonance. They also howl when in distress,” Holleman said.

As an anthropologist might spend years chronicling the habits of a specific cultural group, Holleman says Haber spent countless hours in blinds tracking wolves, chronicling everything from their social habits, to how they eat.

“Gordon talks about an old timer who hated wolves because wolves would take down the animal and eat out its guts and just leave it. He found an animal with its guts eaten out and the rest of the animal left. But Gordon said actually the wolves will scavenge a winter-killed moose but the moose is so frozen that they only eat so much of it and then they come back later for the rest, unless they’re disturbed by a human, which is what happened in that instance,” she said.

Holleman’s book includes stories from people who ran into Haber during his time as a biologist for the National Park Service, including one from mountain climber Johnny Johnson, whose food cache was buried in an avalanche in 1972. Haber had hamburgers and french fries dropped to Johnson’s climbing team.

Holleman also includes snippets from Haber’s Twitter feed: “Raw, wild beauty at the den tonight, with the wolves howling a great chorus for me as rolling thunder from a passing storm shakes the valley” tweeted Haber, four months before his death.

“He could write for a scientific audience very clearly: his research reports and articles in Conservation Biology and other journals,” Holleman said. “And he could write pretty astonishingly concise letters to the Board of Game and other entities that he was communicating with and then he could writer for a general audience. His blog and these tweets really showed that.”

Holleman’s epilogue paints a dark picture for the future of Denali’s wolf population. The Park Service has reported declining numbers in recent years, but biologists there maintain that trend isn’t out of the ordinary. But the issue remains politicized. Environmental groups continue to clash with the Board of Game. In 2010, they set a six-year moratorium on all proposals regarding the Denali-area wolf population.

Categories: Alaska News

Alaska Native Leader Don Wright Passes Away

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 16:26

Alaska Native leader Don Wright has died. He was 84 when he passed away at home on July 5.

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Wright was instrumental in developing the tribal lands compensation legislation, Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, signed by President Richard Nixon in 1971. Wright was leader of the Alaska Federation of Natives that year.

Wright helped organize AFN during the 1960s, and fought to get the best settlement possible for Alaska Natives. Wright and other Native leaders traveled to Washington, DC to lobby for the law, even though funds were scarce. Wright often used his own money for airfare and expenses, since AFN in its early days had no funds at all. Despite the odds, Wright was successful in getting Nixon administration backing for the settlement.

ANCSA compensated Alaska Natives for loss of lands and established regional and village Native corporations with the right to select 44 million acres of land and appropriated $962.5 million to them.

Wright was born in Nenana in 1929. He became a pilot and established his own air service. He later formed a construction company, and helped build airstrips and roads in the Interior. He also helped build the first oil field camp at Prudhoe Bay.

Wright’s family says he was a champion for Alaska. His funeral will take place July 26th in Nenana.

Categories: Alaska News

AK: Bear Aware

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 16:25

Naturalist Steve Merli shares a little known fact – a bear has never been documented harming a person that’s in a group of five or more. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

For naturalist Steve Merli, bear education isn’t just about staying alive. The way he sees it, knowing how to behave in bear country allows Alaskans to explore wilderness more deeply.

Merli works with Discovery Southeast, a Juneau organization that connects kids with nature programs.

Earlier this month, KTOO’s Lisa Phu joined campers for a lesson that had some questioning their assumptions about bear encounters.

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Discovery Southeast campers walk down Auke Lake trail. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

Part of Steve Merli’s job is to change these sorts of perceptions:

“In some comics, like Tundra, it shows bears, like, they just go up to a campsite and eat the person,” one camper says.

Another says, “I have not heard any show that says bears are good in any way.”

He tells the campers more people are attacked by dogs than bears. He also says a bear has never been documented harming a person that’s in a group of five or more.

“So we’re already in a good spot. If a bear passes by, we’re already in a group and a bear is not going to go, ‘That one looks tasty.’ It’s not going to do that to us. It’s just going to go, ‘Woah, there are a lot of humans, I’m outta here,’” Merli says.

Merli says going off-trail makes him become “more focused.” (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

But he also reminds them, “There are lots of bears that live around here, so every time you’re outside of a building, a school, your house, you’re in bear country.”

Merli moved to Juneau in 1981. He’s been an educator for Discovery Southeast or 25 years. During the school year, he brings elementary students outside into nature. He teaches them how to identify landforms, animal tracks and creatures that live in the water.

In the summer, he joins the campers on hikes and talks about bears. He’s excited to take them beyond the beaten Auke Lake trail.

Merli picks a spot and heads right, up a steep hill.

“When we go off trail, it always kind of wakes up something inside me, like I become more focused because I don’t know what’s on the other side of the hill,” Merli says.

The campers follow, walking through a thick growth of ferns and moss and lots of devil’s club.

Campers maneuver around the forest of devil’s club surrounding Auke Lake Trail. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

“Oh yeah, you’re just going to dance with the devil’s club,” Merli adds.

He gathers the campers in one spot and points to an imaginary bear about a hundred yards away.

“So I’m coming up the hill and I look up and there’s a bear over there and the first thing I’m going to do is, I’m just going to stop,” Merli says.

The next step is to assess the situation.

“Does that bear know I’m here? And by and large, if it’s that close, that bear probably knows I’m here, so I’m going to have a conversation with it,” Merli says.

He doesn’t suggest raising your voice and looking big and scary, but to simply talk with the bear, like this, “I was just coming up this hill, Bear, and I know that I’m in your living room and I’m just going to check out going back down the way I came because this is your place.”

Merli tells the campers to keep talking as you slowly back away. The bear could stay where it is or move away itself.

Brooke Sanford role plays being a bear. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

Twelve-year-old Landon Jueong learned a different way to deal with bears from his grandfather.

“To scare away the bear by acting big and making the bear not want to go around you or mess with you,” Landon says.

After taking turns roleplaying bear and hiker, practicing Merli’s method, both Landon and 12-year-old Brooke Sanford prefer it.

“I think it was a good way because you are avoiding the bear. You weren’t going towards it or scaring it away,” says Brooke, who has seen bears before.

“I don’t think I’d be afraid of bears in a group, but like alone, if you’re just walking through the woods alone, it might be a little bit scary,” she says.

Landon has this advice for anyone who’s scared of bears: “Bears are more afraid of you than you are of them.”

Merli says having a conversation with a bear allows it to know where you are.

“The average encounter with a bear is one of proximity and orientation so all I’m doing is allowing the bear to orient to me and if I’m all feisty over there, the bear may orient to me more aggressively. And I’ve never tested that,” he says.

Merli spends a lot of his time outdoors, often exploring Juneau’s mountains, cutting down firewood or hunting for food. Like other adventurous Alaskans, he can’t even count the times he’s encountered bears.

“So many,” Merli laughs.

In all that time, he’s only had one encounter that didn’t go so well. Luckily, he was near a house and could just run inside.

Merli’s goal in educating students is to make them feel safe and comfortable in nature. This, he says, will allow them to explore the outdoors and, at the same time, themselves.

“It’s really not about wildness out there; it’s about this wildness inside. Not that savage connotation, but this wild being that’s just like a bear. It’s really capable of this graceful capacity for self-care. I’m hungry, I eat. I need to protect myself, I do it. I’m tired, I sleep. This sounds ludicrous to the construct in which most of us are moving in the modern world,” he says.

Merli says there are a thousand stories out there turning bears into scary creatures. But most of them aren’t true. Those stories, he says, are just about our own fear.

Categories: Alaska News

300 Villages: Palmer

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 16:24

This week on AK we’re heading to Palmer, home to the state’s only musk ox farm. Mark Austin is director of the musk ox farm in Palmer.

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Categories: Alaska News

Alaska News Nightly: July 11, 2014

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 16:13

Individual news stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via emailpodcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn.

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Denali Commission Money Survives House

Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington DC

In Congress this week, the Denali Commission survived another attempt to strip it of federal funds.

Fairbanks Wind Energy Battle Continues

Dan Bross, KUAC – Fairbanks

A Fairbanks based alternative energy company continues to push Golden Valley Electric Association to buy more of its wind power. Alaska Environmental Power operates a wind farm in Delta Junction, and recently teamed with an Anchorage law firm on a report it hopes will sway utility members.

Rep. Guttenberg Looks To Jumpstart Fairbanks LNG

Dan Bross, KUAC – Fairbanks

State Representative David Guttenberg wants to jumpstart Fairbanks’ conversion to natural gas heating. The state is pursuing a public private project to process North Slope gas and truck it to Fairbanks, but Gutenberg says it faces a familiar problem.

Fairbanks Rains Approach Record Levels

Dan Bross, KUAC – Fairbanks

Scattered rain showers are in the Fairbanks area forecast, and any precipitation that falls will add to local totals that have Fairbanks on track to continue breaking wet weather records.  The last rain event Monday, a thunderstorm that brought heavy downpours boosted July precipitation even further above normal. The National Weather Service reports that Monday’s thunderstorm dropped 1.13 inches at Fairbanks International where the agency takes its official measurements.

‘Among Wolves’ Details Researcher’s Lifelong Passion

Emily Schwing, KUAC – Fairbanks

Earlier this year, the University of Alaska Press released a book detailing a biologist’s life-long effort to chronicle the lives of wolves that live inside the boundary of Denali Park and Preserve.

Marybeth Holleman was a friend of Doctor Gordon Haber, who was killed in a plane crash in Denali in 2009. Holleman spent the last few years digging through forty years’ worth of Haber’s field notes, journals and even tweets. Holleman has compiled Haber’s work into a new book.

Alaska Native Leader Don Wright Passes Away

Ellen Lockyer, KSKA – Anchorage

Alaska Native leader Don Wright has died.  He was 84 when he passed away at home on July 5.  Wright was instrumental in developing the tribal lands compensation legislation, Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, signed by President Richard Nixon in 1971. Wright was leader of the Alaska Federation of Natives that year.

AK: Bear Aware

Lisa Phu, KTOO – Juneau

For naturalist Steve Merli, bear education isn’t just about staying alive. The way he sees it, knowing how to behave in bear country allows Alaskans to explore wilderness more deeply.

Merli works with Discovery Southeast, a Juneau organization that connects kids with nature programs.

Earlier this month, KTOO’s Lisa Phu joined campers for a lesson that had some questioning their assumptions about bear encounters.

300 Villages: Palmer

This week on AK we’re heading to Palmer, home to the state’s only musk ox farm. Mark Austin is director of the musk ox farm in Palmer.

Categories: Alaska News

Lieutenant Governor Primary Election: Bob Williams

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 12:00

(Photo courtesy Bob Williams)

In Alaska, the Lieutenant Governor has duties beyond backing up the Governor and keeping custody of the State Seal. The Lieutenant Governor oversees the enactment of regulations and the Division of Elections. Two Democrats are vying for that nomination in August, and your chance to get to know them is coming up on “Talk of Alaska.” Bob Williams was Teacher of the Year and now wants to be Lieutenant Governor.

HOST: Steve Heimel, Alaska Public Radio Network

GUESTS:

  • Bob Williams, candidate
  • Callers Statewide

PARTICIPATE:

  • Post your comment before, during or after the live broadcast (comments may be read on air).
  • Send e-mail to talk [at] alaskapublic [dot] org (comments may be read on air)
  • Call 550-8422 in Anchorage or 1-800-478-8255 if you’re outside Anchorage during the live broadcast

LIVE Broadcast: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. on APRN stations statewide.

SUBSCRIBE: Get Talk of Alaska updates automatically by e-mailRSS or podcast.

TALK OF ALASKA ARCHIVE

Categories: Alaska News

Alaska Edition: Friday July 11, 2014

APRN Alaska News - Fri, 2014-07-11 07:26

Alaska Natives go to federal court to force the state to provide more voting assistance to Native-language speakers. Shopping may never be the same in Bethel. Arctic Slope Regional Corporation endorses Dan Sullivan for the Senate.  Sullivan and incumbent Mark Begich exchange  hostile advertisements. Congressman Don Young receives a “letter of reproval” from the House Ethics Committee. The KABATA  moves forward with the Knik Arm Crossing: Buildings on Government Hill will be torn down. Senate candidate Joe Miller goes after his Republican opponents on the immigration issue.

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HOST: Michael Carey

GUESTS:

  • Richard Mauer, Alaska Dispatch/ADN.
  • Steve MacDonald Channel 2 News.
  • Lisa Demer, Alaska Dispatch/ADN.

KSKA (FM 91.1) BROADCAST: Friday July 11 at 2:00 p.m. and Saturday, June 12 at 6:00 p.m.

Alaska Public Television BROADCAST: Friday, July 11 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday July 12 at 4:30 PM.

Categories: Alaska News
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