Alaska News

State Selects North Slope Gas Partner

APRN Alaska News - Wed, 2014-01-15 17:47

The Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority has selected a business partner for development of a natural gas processing plant on the North Slope. At a meeting yesterday (Tuesday) the AIDEA board chose a group lead by MWH Americas to construct the plant that will liquefy gas for trucking to Fairbanks. KUAC’s Dan Bross reports.

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Categories: Alaska News

“Irregularities” Found in State Crime Lab Drug Samples

APRN Alaska News - Wed, 2014-01-15 17:46

It looks as if somebody tampered with drug samples at the state crime laboratory in Anchorage. The state Troopers put out a short press release today saying that new equipment has shown small amounts of foreign materials in the so-called “reference” samples used to compare with and estimate evidence in drug cases.

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The release goes on to say that this discovery does not compromise the validity of past drug tests, or the lab’s ability to continue testing drugs. It says a criminal investigation has begun. It refers all questions to the state’s head prosecutor, John Skidmore, who would not give many more details
about the probe:

“I’m going to decline to predict how long it will take. But I can tell you that it is a top priority both of the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Investigations as well as the Department of Law’s Office of Special Prosecutions, so there are very experienced and dedicated people who are going to be working very this intensively until we have the answers.”

The drugs involved were codeine, opium, morphine, amphetamine, oxycodone and hydrocodone. Skidmore said the size of a reference sample can vary, as can the length of time a laboratory uses it:

“How long any given standard has been in the lab or timing of when any foreign matter made its way into those standards are all subject to the investigation and so I wouldn’t comment any further than that.”

It’s not clear when the adulteration of the drug samples was detected. Skidmore says the lab began using improved drug analysis equipment when it moved into its new facility last year:

“And they, with the new instruments, detected some other readings that previously nobody had seen, and those other readings caused them to examine their known substances further and find some irregularities with them.”

The press release goes on to say that investigators will be notifying attorneys who may have had cases involving the lab’s drug testing standards.

Categories: Alaska News

$500 Tickets to be Issued for Spice, Bath Salts

APRN Alaska News - Wed, 2014-01-15 17:45

Anchorage has a new law that fines people in possession of the designer drug spice. It’s the city’s second try at cracking down on the drug…after failed attempts with a narrow law that focused on contents that manufacturers change quickly. The Anchorage Assembly acted quickly Tuesday after hearing public testimony on the damage that spice has been doing.

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Municipal Prosecutor Cynthia Franklin shows the difference between real incense and the drug Spice disguised as incense.

 

The drugs, marketed as synthetic marijuana, with names like brainfreeze and trainwreck are sometimes disguised as potpourri, bath salts or incense but are sold by the ounce. Law enforcement experts say Spice makes people act more like their on PCP or Meth, than smoking pot. They develop superhuman strength, euphoria and violent mood swings. Officials have been looking for a way to stop Spice since it showed up in the city a few years back. But manufactures, mostly in Asia don’t list ingredients on packaging and lab tests can’t keep up with drug manufactures changing recipes, so it’s been hard to address through the legal system.
About half a dozen citizens spoke out in support of the new Spice ordinance.
Shawn Williams who owns a business blocks from a downtown smoke shop said one day he looked out his window and saw a man passed out on the sidewalk.

“We called 9-1-1. AFD and APD shows up. After about 15 minutes the guy comes around and immediately reaches in his pocket – the officer was trying to figure out what was going on – and he pulls out this little glass case and the guy says, ‘it’s Spice. I just bought it a few minutes ago.’”

Sometimes designer drugs like Spice are disguised as Potpourri.

Williams says incidents with Spice are all-too-common in the downtown business district where he works. David Rittenberg, a program manager at the Brother Francis Shelter says over the past year he and his staff have seen a sharp increase in drug related offences at the shelter because of homeless people who are using Spice.

“It’s a very, very dangerous drug mainly because how inconsistent it can be with the affects that it has on people. We have witnessed people using this drug exhibit uncontrollable rage, belligerence, rapid and extreme mood swings, uncontrollable outbursts all the way to seizures, unconsciousness.”

Tom McGrath who worked on the Spenard Action Committee to drive massage parlors out of the neighborhood says now the Spice shops are bringing in more problems.

“Now the same type of people are coming back with these spice shops, the same type of element that we drove out in the 80s and 90s. The Spenard Action Committee, we’ll reconstitute if we have to cause we’re not going to accept this type of thing in our community.”

After hearing the testimony on Spice, the Assembly voted in a new law. It’s allows police officers to issue something akin to a traffic ticket, but for drugs. If Anchorage police officers find a person or business in possession of Spice they can now write a ticket per vial, tube or packet. Municipal Prosecutor Cynthia Franklin says the new law identifies the substances without actually naming their chemical compounds or makeup.

Packets of the drug spice found in smoke shops are packaged like candy with names like Brainfreeze.

“They identify it by it’s packaging, by it’s price point, by it’s claims. By the fact that it says on its package that it’s not a controlled substance even though it says it’s potpourri. That makes no sense. Potpourri is not a controlled substance so why would it say on it’s package that it’s not a controlled substance. What this ordinance says is that if it says it’s not a controlled substance then it’s an illicit synthetic drug and it’s illegal.”

The new law is based on one that was passed in Maine and will make laboratory tests less necessary. Anchorage Police Chief Mark Mew is pleased with the new law and says says it’s a step in the right direction.

“It’s a low level crime, it’s handled low, it’s handled in an inexpensive way for the public. And while it’s not the total solution, it is a simple solution that we can put to use right a way while the more complex law starts developing.”

The tickets are $500 per item. Officers could begin issuing them as early as this week.

Categories: Alaska News

New Study Shows Alaska Natives Are More Vulnerable To Flu

APRN Alaska News - Wed, 2014-01-15 17:44

Indigenous populations in Alaska and Australia are more vulnerable to flu. That’s according to a study published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. As KUAC’s Emily Schwing reports, scientists are using their finding to help native populations fight flu in the future.

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Categories: Alaska News

Cook Inlet Fishermen Want Federal Fisheries Oversight

APRN Alaska News - Wed, 2014-01-15 16:34

The 300 driftnetters that belong to United Cook Inlet Drift Associaion,  or UCIDA , say the state’s current Cook Inlet salmon management plan violates the Magnuson Stevens Act, and they are suing.

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 The suit was filed by UCIDA   just a year ago in federal district court in Washington DC. It challenges the validity of Amendment 12 of the Fisheries Management Plan [FMP] for salmon fisheries in the federal Exclusive Economic Zone [EEZ] off the coast of Alaska. Amendment 12 essentially eliminates the EEZ waters in three areas of Alaska: in Prince William Sound, Cook Inlet and the western end of the Alaska Peninsula.

Dr. Roland Maw heads Soldotna – based UCIDA

“Half the area where we fish is in the federal EEZ. These are in federal waters and they are federally owned fish at that point. And, as such, we felt that the federal government has a piece of legislation called Magnuson Stevens Act that has certain requirements concerning the biology and management of those stocks. “

 The state of Alaska has  intervened in the suit, on the side of the defendants, because Amendment 12 removes federal oversight from the three areas and allows the state to manage salmon in those areas as it has since statehood. Cora Campbell is commissioner of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and testified Tuesday at a finance subcommittee hearing on the issue in Anchorage.

“If you talk to federal managers, they will tell you why they are so ill -suited to manage salmon fisheries. Salmon fisheries management requires responsive in-season management. We respond to what we’re seeing on the ground on at least a daily, if not hourly, basis. If you talk to a federal lmanager, they will tell you, ‘well we can’t close fisheries on weekends, because we have to publish a notice in the Federal Register, it takes several days.’ Most people that I know that rely on fisheries don’t want to be managed on the rigid, inflexible schedule. “

 

Campbell has a voting seat on the North Pacific Fishery Management Council. She says Amendment 12 was crafted in 2011, specifically to keep state management of salmon in the three areas.

The UCIDA suit defies the very intention of statehood, according to Chugiak Representative Bill Stoltze, who chaired Tuesday’s hearing

“They [UCIDA] wanted the obscurity of a DC courtroom, and now, they’ve lost that. Now it’s in an Alaskan venue, with the state agressively asserting the rights of state management.”

 But Maw points out that Southeast Alaska has a federal FMP  for salmon, something that applies to fish stocks that require conservation. And UCIDA is not asking for anything different.

“Both of these governments need to be at the table deciding what will be the management strategy. We’ve got, I think, five or six chinook stocks in Cook Inlet that are in trouble. We have stocks, that are now, if people would make the application, could qualify for Endangered Species.”

 Maw says that UCIDA only wants the state and federal government to manage the stocks as they move into Alaska waters, because what goes on in the EEZ affects what goes on in state waters.

The plaintiffs had filed for summary judgement in August of 2013, and the state filed it’s cross motion in October of last year.  UCIDA must reply by Wednesday.  An assistant attorney general for the state says the arguments could be heard in a month, and a decision could come by early summer.

Categories: Alaska News

Anchorage Assembly Passes Spice Ticketing Law

APRN Alaska News - Wed, 2014-01-15 07:44

Prosecutor Cynthia Franklin holds an empty container labeled potpourri which once held the drug Spice. The new law allows police officers to issue $500 tickets based on the packaging, price point and claims of the drug rather than it’s chemical composition.

Anchorage has a new law that fines people in possession of the designer drug spice. It’s the city’s second try at cracking down on the drug…after failed attempts with a narrow law that focused on contents that manufacturers change quickly. The Anchorage Assembly acted quickly after hearing public testimony on the damage that spice has been doing.

It’s just like a traffic ticket, but for drugs. Anchorage police officers can now write anyone a ticket per vial, tube or pack in possession of a spice or bath salt product. Municipal Prosecutor Cynthia Franklin says the new law identifies the substances without actually naming their chemical compounds or makeup.

“They identify it by it’s packaging, by it’s price point, by it’s claims. By the fact that it says on its package that it’s not a controlled substance even though it says it’s potpourri. That makes no sense. Potpourri is not a controlled substance so why would it say on it’s package that it’s not a controlled substance. What this ordinance says is that if it says it’s not a controlled substance then it’s an illicit synthetic drug and it’s illegal.”

Prosecutor Cynthia Franklin holds a packet of Spice labeled Brainfreeze. The new law passed by the Anchorage Assembly Tuesday allows police to issue tickets based on the name and claims on the packaging and on it’s cost.

Franklin, who helped pass the first spice ordinance in 2010, says manufacturers of drug change its composition quickly. The new law is based on one that was passed in Maine and will make laboratory tests less necessary. Anchorage Police Chief Mark Mew says the new law gives police a way to immediately to get the drug off the streets, through ticketing.

“You pay a fine. That fine, if you don’t pay it will go to your permanent fund. It’s quick. Because it’s quick, because it’s not criminal you don’t get a free attorney from the government, you don’t get a right to jury trial. It’s a low level crime, it’s handled low, it’s handled in an inexpensive way for the public. And while it’s not the total solution, it is a simple solution that we can put to use right a way while the more complex law starts developing.”

The tickets are $500 per item. Officers could begin issuing them as early as this week.
outcue

Categories: Alaska News

Former DNR Commissioner Dan Sullivan Raises $1.2 Million For Senate Race

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 18:24

The U.S. Senate campaign of Dan Sullivan announced today how much money he collected in his first three months of fund-raising – $1.2 million.

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It’s a fast start for the former Natural Resources Commissioner, who is in a three-way race for the Republican primary.

None of the other candidates has released a fourth quarter total yet, but judging by previous reports, Sullivan is likely to have raised a lot more than his Republican rivals, Mead Treadwell and Joe Miller. Even incumbent Sen. Mark Begich hasn’t raised $1.2 million in a single quarter so far, although he raised more than twice that in the first nine months of last year. Sullivan campaign spokesman Mike Anderson says it’ll take serious money to go against Begich.

“We are honored and thankful for the support that we’ve received from Alaskans and people across the country,” Anderson said.

The campaign isn’t saying how much of that money is from Alaskans. Sullivan has held multiple Lower 48 fundraisers. His spokesman says the details will be in the report they file with the Federal Election Commission, and that isn’t due until the end of the month.

Anchorage Political consultant Art Hackney, who is raising money for a pro-Sullivan PAC, says posting an impressive number puts Sullivan on the map.

“I think the biggest thing people have been saying is they’re not quite sure who he is,” Hackney said. “This will get him exactly what he needs, is people saying now I’m going to pay attention, I’d like to know more about him.”

A survey by Ivan Moore published last month shows Treadwell leading with 34 percent of the vote in a three-way Republican primary, but Sullivan was close behind, nearly within the margin of error. The survey showed Joe Miller winning in much of the Railbelt, including Fairbanks, Mat-Su and the Kenai Peninsula, and Treadwell ahead in Anchorage and Southeast.

Categories: Alaska News

Shishmaref Delegation Meets With Climate Change Task Force

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 18:23

A delegation from Shishmaref is visiting Congress to explain how their world is changing. Shishmaref Native Corporation President Tony Weyiouanna told lawmakers at a climate task force meeting the village used to have so much beach they played baseball on it. Now, with the water level rising and the island eroding, they don’t have enough shore to dig clams. They’re finding tumors and hair loss on the marine mammals. The ice isn’t thick enough for safe travel.

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Categories: Alaska News

Juneau Businesses Take The Bitcoin Lead

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 18:22

Bitcoin is a digital currency not backed by any country’s government. The currency only exists on the Internet and has been growing in popularity over the past year and a half.

Now, a few businesses in the capital city are starting to deal in bit coin and accept it for payment.

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In the Alaska Robotics shop in downtown Juneau, shelves are lined with comic books and graphic novels, local art hangs from the walls, and kids talk about Minecraft.

“Do you have any comic books about Minecraft?” a young customer asks shop owner Pat Race.

“Oh, that’s a good question. I don’t think we do… ” Race replies checking his inventory, but he sees that such a comic book does exist and says he’ll order it.

“It’s kind of sciencey,” the customer explains. “You put sand in a furnace and make glass”

Besides Minecraft, another hot topic at the shop is bitcoin. Owner Pat Race got his first bitcoin last spring. “I sent a MoneyGram off to some Eastern European country and then my bitcoin appeared in some account.”

Race bought $150 worth, which, at the time, equaled one bitcoin. Since then, the value of bitcoin has fluctuated. “Back at the beginning of 2013, the price was about $18-$19 for a bitcoin and it peaked at about $1,242 in mid-Nov. and then immediately crashed down to almost $500 in Dec. and is back up to about $800-$850,” Race explains.

Race wants to incorporate bitcoin into his business.

“I would like to adopt bitcoin here at the store just because I think it will emerge as a global currency. And I don’t know if specifically it will be bitcoin but I think some kind of cryptocurrency is in our future,” he says.

Alaska Robotics recently advertised its first item selling for bitcoin – a limited edition print of Miley Cyrus riding a bitcoin with drones flying overhead. It costs .04 bitcoin. That’s the equivalent of roughly $30, and Race is only accepting bitcoin.

He’s not the only business owner in Juneau embracing cryptocurrency. In the window of Gold & Silver Exchange at Nugget Mall, a sign reads, “bitcoin – BUY/SELL”

“It’s only been there three weeks but it’s gotten a lot of attention, ” says owner Dylan Hammons. He’s only sold bitcoin to one person, but he’s not worried. He considers his shop the hub of the bitcoin community. “There’s a lot of talk about bitcoin. I’ve been talking about bitcoin pretty much nonstop for the last month and a half since it shot through the roof, so I’m chatting everybody up about it. There’s a lot of people that are showing interest. People are aware of it now.”

Hammons says some people who got into bitcoin a couple years ago are now bitcoin millionaires.

“From what I hear, there’s actually a bitcoin millionaire walking around town here, so that’s pretty big news,” Hammons says.

When asked if he was the bitcoin millionaire, Hammons replies, ”No, it’s not me. I wish it was.”

Hammons hopes to capitalize on educating others about bitcoin, specifically other Juneau businesses. “The more people get bitcoin into their head, the more they’re going to want to spend it. So, as time goes on, more people are going to be coming into their shops and asking, ‘Hey, do you guys take bitcoin?’ And then the businesses are going to be like, ‘Oh hey, wait a minute, we better figure this thing out.’ So then they’re going to be calling people and that’s where I come in and I go and show them how to do it.”

Northern Economics Senior Economist Jonathan King is surprised with the bitcoin activity in Juneau businesses. “Wow,” he says, “they’re starting to accept bitcoin, huh?”

He doesn’t know of other Alaska businesses doing it, but thinks those that are may be ahead of the curve.

“It’s really interesting and definitely puts those businesses out on the leading edge of a new frontier,” King says.

With that, he says, comes inherent risk, “If you end up in a volatile currency that changes value rapidly, you could end up a big winner or you could end up a big loser.”

The idea of alternatives to traditional currency has been around for a while, but King says bitcoin is something different:

“You can get online, you can do business with somebody in India, you can do business with somebody in China, or you can do it locally if you can find somebody who’s willing to take them, and I think that’s what makes it different. It’s probably one of the first internationally exchangeable alternative currencies.”

King anticipates regulatory hurdles when it comes to taxes. “The U.S. Treasury is probably going to be want an accounting of the exchanges that occurred with bitcoin and they’re probably going to want to get paid in dollars.”

Alaska Robotics owner Pat Race isn’t too worried about that yet. He admits the concept of accepting bitcoin is a bit gimmicky at this point, “but it’s also a technology that I want to support. I think that tourists that come in and say, ‘Oh wow, I found this shop in Alaska that took bitcoin’ – I think it will be a very limited – but those people will be excited to see it.”

This summer, Race plans to accept bitcoin for everything in the store, which means soon you can go into Alaska Robotics and buy a Minecraft comic book with a simple  scan of your smart phone.

Categories: Alaska News

Fairbanks Militia Leader Holding Anti-Gun-Control Rally

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 18:21

A local militia leader is organizing an anti-gun-control rally that’ll be held next month in downtown Fairbanks. The rally is one of five to be held around the state on Feb. 23 to show support for the Second Amendment and other right-wing political causes.

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Categories: Alaska News

Alaska News Nightly: January 14, 2014

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 18:07

Individual news stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via emailpodcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn.

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Former DNR Commissioner Dan Sullivan Raises $1.2 Million For Senate Race

Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington DC

The U.S. Senate campaign of Dan Sullivan announced today how much money he collected in his first three months of fund-raising: $1.2 million. It’s a fast start for the former Natural Resources Commissioner, who is in a three-way race for the Republican primary.

Shishmaref Delegation Meets With Climate Change Task Force

Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington DC

A delegation from Shishmaref is visiting Congress to explain how their world is changing. Shishmaref Native Corporation President Tony Weyiouanna told lawmakers at a climate task force meeting the village used to have so much beach they played baseball on it. Now, with the water level rising and the island eroding, they don’t have enough shore to dig clams. They’re finding tumors and hair loss on the marine mammals. The ice isn’t thick enough for safe travel.

Lawsuit Could Bring Federal Oversight Into Salmon Harvests

Ellen Lockyer, KSKA – Anchorage

A federal lawsuit filed by a Cook Inlet fishermen’s group seeks to overturn state salmon management in some parts of Alaska. The suit targets the National Marine Fisheries Service, among other federal agencies, and, if successful, could bring federal oversight into some of the state’s salmon harvests.

Juneau Businesses Take The Bitcoin Lead

Lisa Phu, KTOO – Juneau

Bitcoin is a digital currency not backed by any country’s government. The currency only exists on the Internet and has been growing in popularity over the past year and a half.

Now, a few businesses in the capital city are starting to deal in bit coin and accept it for payment.

Fairbanks Militia Leader Holding Anti-Gun-Control Rally

Tim Ellis, KUAC – Fairbanks

A local militia leader is organizing an anti-gun-control rally that’ll be held next month in downtown Fairbanks. The rally is one of five to be held around the state on Feb. 23 to show support for the Second Amendment and other right-wing political causes.

World Wildlife Fund Releasing Walrus Ivory Report

Zachariah Hughes, KNOM – Nome

Next month, the World Wildlife Fund is releasing a report on walrus ivory.

Grant Advances Kasaan Longhouse Repairs

Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska – Juneau

A nearly-half-million-dollar grant will speed restoration of Alaska’s oldest Haida  longhouse. The structure was first built 130 years ago.

Dena’ina Athabascan Exhibit Wraps Up At Anchorage Museum

Lori Townsend, APRN – Anchorage

Sunday marked the final day of the Dena’ina Athabascan exhibit at the Anchorage Museum. A culmination of seven years of work, the exhibit reveals the art, history, culture and science of the lives of the people whose territory Anchorage now encompasses. Aaron Leggett is one of the curators and a Dena’ina tribal member. We walked through the exhibit one last time on Sunday. Leggett says thousands of Anchorage school children, residents and tourists visited during the four month run. The exhibit starts with a contemporary fish camp scene. One of Leggett’s favorite parts of the exhibit is a slide show of the Dena’ina people.

Categories: Alaska News

World Wildlife Fund Releasing Walrus Ivory Report

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 18:00

Next month, the World Wildlife Fund is releasing a report on walrus ivory.

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Categories: Alaska News

Grant Advances Kasaan Longhouse Repairs

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 17:59

The roof of Kasaan’s Chief Son-i-Hat House, also known as the Whale House, is covered by a tarp during repair work. (Organized Village of Kasaan.)

A nearly-half-million-dollar grant will speed restoration of Alaska’s oldest Haida longhouse. The structure was first built 130 years ago.

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Haida Chief Son-i-Hat built the original longhouse in the 1880s at the village of Kasaan. It’s on the eastern side of Southeast’s Prince of Wales Island, about 30 miles northwest of Ketchikan.

It was called Naay I’waans, The Great House. Many know it as The Whale House, for some of the carvings inside.

Scaffolding allows repairs to the Kasaan Whale House smokehole, which was damaged by rot. (Organized Village of Kasaan.)

It deteriorated, as wooden buildings in the rain forest do. The Civilian Conservation Corps, a depression-era employment program, rebuilt it in the late 1930s.

Now, the house badly needs repair again.

“It’s a matter of our cultural revitalization, showing that we’re still here and part of these lands,” says Richard Peterson, president of the Tribal Council for the Organized Village of Kasaan.

The tribal government is partnering with the Native village corporation Kavilco, and its cultural arm, the Kasaan Haida Heritage Foundation.

“A lot of the building is still in really good condition. Some of the supports are what’s failing. I think we’re fortunate enough that we don’t need a total reconstruction, so we want to maintain as much as we can,” Peterson says.

Read more about the effort.

An analysis by Juneau-based MRV Architects estimated full repairs would cost more than $2 million. A scaled-back plan totaled about $1.4 million. It listed several phases to be completed as funds came in.

And they have. In late November, the Anchorage-based Rasmuson Foundation awarded the project $450,000. Peterson says that, plus funds from the tribal government and its partners, is about enough to complete the work.

“So right now, we’re milling up the logs and they’re going to hand-adz all of the timbers. And we’re just going in and starting to secure up some of the corners that are dropping down. It’s been a really exciting project,” Peterson says.

The effort to stabilize the longhouse has been underway for around two years. But it picked up speed last summer.

The lead carver is Stormy Hamar, who is working with apprentices Eric Hamar, his son, and Harley Bell-Holter. Others volunteer.

Peterson says it’s an all-ages effort.

“The great part is these young kids that are getting involved. And it’s across the lines. Native, non-Native, it doesn’t matter. There’s been a real interest by the youth there,” Peterson says.

Work continues through the winter. Peterson says the focus now is repairing or replacing structural elements so the longhouse doesn’t collapse.

The Whale House is already attracting attention. Independent travelers drive the 17-mile dirt road that starts near Thorne Bay. And Sitka-based Alaska Dream Cruises also stops in Kasaan, where the house is on the list of sights to see.

“Because it’s off-site, you’re not going to see any modern technology. There’s no cars driving by. You can really see how our people lived 200 years ago and experience that and look at those totems in a natural setting,” Peterson says. “It wasn’t put there for a park. This is how it was. And I think people really appreciate that.”

Without too many surprises, Peterson hopes work can be completed in around two years.

Then, he says, the tribe will host a celebration like the one Wrangell leaders put on last year when they finished the Chief Shakes Tribal House.

Categories: Alaska News

Dena’ina Athabascan Exhibit Wraps Up At Anchorage Museum

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-01-14 17:58

Sunday marked the final day of the Dena’ina Athabascan exhibit at the Anchorage Museum. A culmination of seven years of work, the exhibit reveals the art, history, culture and science of the lives of the people whose territory Anchorage now encompasses. Aaron Leggett is one of the curators and a Dena’ina tribal member. We walked through the exhibit one last time on Sunday. Leggett says thousands of Anchorage school children, residents and tourists visited during the four month run. The exhibit starts with a contemporary fish camp scene. One of Leggett’s favorite parts of the exhibit is a slide show of the Dena’ina people.

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The exhibit opens with a fish camp scene that is contemporary but displays cultural continuity for thousands of years.

Yes, at one time there were salmon cultures up and down both the east and west coasts and most of them are gone now. But in Alaska, certainly for the Dena’ina, the Yupik, the Tlingit in southeast, we still have sustainable wild salmon runs so this literally is an unbroken chain of activities that goes back thousands of years, our ability to go out and put up fish for the winter time. It varies from community to community, like in Eklutna, where I’m from, we have to have an educational permit, but nevertheless, it’s not about the number of fish, it’s about the activity, and being able to pass that on to future generations to know how to put in a net, how to catch fish, how to split fish, how to dry fish for the winter. It’s about the activity not the quantity necessarily.

So let’s walk on a little bit. We’re by the fish camp now. When we come into the next room, give us the visual here.

So in this gallery, this is organized around Dena’ina identity. And it takes you through Dena’ina life cycle. A slide show with photographs going back to the 1880s all the way up to contemporary photographs. There’s about 180 images and it takes about 12 minutes to watch, but I know Dena’ina people who have sat here and watched the entire slide show and they see pictures of their family. Themselves, parents, grandparents, great grandparents, it’s about people, not just objects from the past. It’s about our people and it’s about our people. So to have images from the 1880s up to last summer when some of these were taken. It shows the continuity over time, so despite all the changes that have occurred, the offices, the shopping malls, the movie theathers. This is still our homeland and we’re still here as a people.

When you were doing the research and collecting these items, you’re quite young, was it odd to think about. I imagine it gave you a better visual of what this area looked like, that is now so urbanized. What were your thoughts about that?

Yes. When I got into college and started to learn more, it really informed the place I lived in. It opened my eyes to think that when my grandmother was a child for example, we had fish camps here in Anchorage and they would go to them and we were able to put up thousands of fish. And in some ways it will be the lasting legacy of the exhibit. There’s no replacing seeing the actual exhibit but I know a hundred years from now that book will still be around and people can go to it to learn what for example this display case with traditional clothing that would have been worn during the 19th century. Tanned caribou hide and woven porcupine quill embroidery. It’s spectacular and really fine work. It’s a style of clothing that hasn’t been done during the 20th century. We actually don’t even know how it was done because the Dena’ina gave up that style by the 1880s. So it’s kind of eye opening even to our own people to see these things because we’ve heard stories about them but we’ve never really seen them up close and personal.

I would imagine that some elements of it stand out more than others for you. What are some of your favorites?

This identity slide show I really like, especially in the context of the exhibition. It really made a difference watching this go in and the difference seeing the objects in here without it and then with them, it really brings it to life and again, brings it back to the idea of a living people. Obviously the dioramas I love, the fish camp and the beluga harpoon. The case with the leadership regalia sticks out to me. The beluga spearer itself is quite a rare object. The only one in the world we have here. The story telling house is neat. To be able to sit down with the I pads and be able to select different stories in both English and Dena’ina. I love it all, but those are some of the things that pop into my mind. Also some of the films in the timeline came out very well, very impressed with being able to convey that history, both the Dena’ina resistance to early Russian occupation but also the Kenaitze Indian tribe struggle for the educational fishery during the 1980s. These are very important stories that aren’t told very often and so bringing that history out will open people’s eyes to the history of the area that we live in both from the distant past , from the late 1700s to something that happened in my lifetime in the 1980s.

One of the displays in this exhibit is the table top, describe that for people who haven’t been here.

Sure. It’s called the Dena’ina dining table.  We rented space here in Anchorage, had a special camera set up high above in the ceiling and it filmed down on the table and we had our eight advisors and myself included, who sat around the table with traditional Dena’ina foods and we had a meal. Everybody sat around and we talked about the food and the land and we had a good time. After we filmed it, we had a projector set up and it throws the image down on to an almost full sized table, so it’s almost a one to one table and people can stand around and watch us eat food and laugh and tell stories and have a good time. Of all the things related to the exhibition, visitor feedback, that’s the number one object. I wouldn’t have thought that but hands down, overwhelmingly, people respond to that dining table. I have to admit, even the first time I saw it, it looked very spectacular. We were able to achieve a really good effect.

What are you hoping that the residents of anchorage and people who have come here to see this, what are you hoping they go away with. What was the whole idea of what you were trying to achieve here?

I think number one, anybody who now, when they say Dena’ina, they can put an image to it. When I was a kid and I said Dena’ina, people would say ‘What’s that?’ and I’d say, we’re the people of this area and they would say, ‘well I didn’t know Natives used to live here,’ and I’d say well, we still live here. So, every time they see the Dena’ina center, they’ll now have an image of who the people are. That’s my hope, if I can think of anything, probably that people will have a visual reference or a quote or a place name or an object will come into their mind now. Because if you say Tlingit, something comes into your mind, if you say Yupik, something comes to mind, if you say Inupiaq, something comes to mind, but if you said Dena’ina, maybe nothing came to mind, so that would be it.

Aaron Leggett will receive the governor’s award for arts in the humanities later this month in Juneau.

Categories: Alaska News

Federal Spending Package Secures Funds For Tribal Health Care Facilities

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-01-13 18:23

In Congress tonight, a massive spending package has emerged after weeks of intense negotiations among lawmakers, and it contains good news for Alaskans. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, top Republican on the subcommittee for Interior Department spending, has announced that she’s secured $66 million to staff the state’s six new tribally operated health care facilities.

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Categories: Alaska News

Alaska’s Affordable Care Act Enrollment Remains Low

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-01-13 18:22

The federal government released numbers today that give an idea of who is signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

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In Alaska, about 3000 people selected marketplace plans before Dec. 28 and 83 percent qualify for a subsidy to help pay for premiums. But Enroll Alaska has seen a steep drop off in the number of people signing up for insurance in the New Year.

Only three other states have lower enrollment figures than Alaska. Eric Earling is spokesperson for Premera Alaska, one of two insurers offering health plans on the federal marketplace in the state. He says the figure for total enrollment in Alaska is low, but not surprising.

“Unfortunately given the reality of the technical challenges healthcare.gov had, enrollment is going to be lower than everybody expected and those numbers reflect that,” Earling said.

Earling says Premera isn’t ready to release its own enrollment figures. Earling says overall, the low numbers can be party attributed to the fact that thousands of Alaskans will be able keep health plans that were supposed to be canceled in 2014. That’s a change President Obama announced in the fall.

Enroll Alaska has signed up more than 900 people in marketplace plans, but the pace of enrollment has slowed considerably. COO Tyann Boling says in the last few weeks of 2013, the company was signing up as many as 70 Alaskans a day for insurance. As soon as January 1st hit, that figure plunged by more than half:

“It was a dramatic decrease and we’re trying to do everything we can to get some momentum going again,” Boling said.

Boling thinks there’s a lot of consumer confusion over enrollment deadlines. Enroll Alaska is renewing their advertising effort to get the word out that people have until March 31st to sign up for insurance to avoid paying a tax penalty.

Boling says the healthcare.gov website has only been working well for about six weeks. She thinks the months when it failed had a big negative impact.

“I think the momentum was crushed because of the functionality of healthcare.gov. I think the people enrolling have always intended to enroll,” Boling said. “And so really our goal and objective is to get out to the people who aren’t aware of this law and truly can benefit from this. I just don’t think people understand there’s a great benefit there for them.”

As Eric Earling, with Premera, puts it, the disastrous healthcare.gov launch “significantly altered the equation of what was possible.”

But he says there’s still time to boost enrollment numbers and it’s too early to draw many conclusions from the federal data. The company expected the first year of the Affordable Care Act would be a roller coaster ride and Earling says Premera was ready.

“There were going to be some twists and turns that were unexpected, there were going to be events that happened in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act that couldn’t be predicted and so everything that the entire system has experienced in the last few months is certainly systemic of that,” Earling said.

Across the country, 1.2 million people have selected marketplace plans on healthcare.gov. The number of enrollments began to spike the last week of November.

Categories: Alaska News

Refinery Owner Seeks Lower Cleanup Level For Tainted Groundwater

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-01-13 18:21

The operator of the North Pole refinery wants the state to set a lower standard for cleaning up the sulfolane groundwater-contamination problem in the North Pole area. Flint Hills Resources Alaska has asked the head of the state Department of Environmental Conservation to set a less-stringent cleanup level for the industrial solvent that leaked into the groundwater for more than a decade before Flint Hills bought the refinery in 2004. The requests could delay cleanup for several months.

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Categories: Alaska News

Akutan Volcano’s Geothermal Power Potential Increases

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-01-13 18:20

The central cone in Akutan Caldera. Photo courtesy Cyrus Read, USGS.

A new study says Akutan Volcano could be an even more promising source of geothermal energy than previously thought.

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It’s been three decades since the U.S. Geological Survey last studied Akutan’s volcano-powered hot springs. Since then, head researcher Deborah Bergfeld says the springs have gotten stronger, and there’s more material from Akutan Volcano dissolved in the springwater.

“These are all good indicators that there might be a reservoir of hot water big enough to supply geothermal power,” she says.

Bergfeld says a volcanic eruption and seismic activity in the 1990s could account for the increase in power potential — the springs are now producing 29 megawatts of heat. That number would shrink when converted into electricity. But Bergfeld says it would still be substantial.

“We don’t have enough data to say how many megawatts of electricity you could get out of it. We just said that there would be a potential for several,” she says. “Each megawatt could power about 750 homes.”

It sounds like a good deal for the city’s small residential population and its large Trident Seafoods processing plant. Right now, that all runs on fuel oil barged in from Unalaska.

But Bergfeld says a strong volcanic resource alone isn’t enough to tell whether geothermal is worth the cost of installation.

“You also have to have a need for the power. So it has to be people living there… there’s a lot of economy,” she says. “The balance has to work out.”

That’s a balance Akutan is hoping to strike. They’ve been working on a plan to tap into their geothermal resource for years, with the help of several grants.

Akutan mayor Joe Bereskin says the new USGS data will help their cause as they work on a business plan.

“I think there’s a customer base here,” he says. “We just have to make the numbers work. And that’s what our next goal is, to see if it all makes financial sense.”

They hope to have that business plan done in the next month.

Categories: Alaska News

Bering Sea Ice Sees 7-Year Expansion

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-01-13 18:19

While sea ice in the Arctic has been undergoing a seven-year decline, sea ice in the Bering Sea has been experiencing a seven-year expansion.

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Categories: Alaska News

Interior Alaska’s River, Lake Ice Thinner Than Normal

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-01-13 18:18

There’s less than normal ice build up on many Interior waters. The National Weather Service drills into ice on rivers and lakes at the start of each month, and agency hydrologist Ed Plumb says January’s measurements showed generally thinner ice.

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Categories: Alaska News

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