Alaska News

Wasilla Clinic Owner Charged With Medicaid Fraud

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 17:43

The owner of a Wasilla disability clinic has been charged with Medicaid fraud. The Alaska Department of Law filed charges against Laura Sasseen, owner of the Mat Su Activity and Respite Center LLC on Monday, alleging falsification of business records and and misdemeanor medical assistance fraud.

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The center, known by its acronym MARC, was shut down in June of this year amid an investigation.

State Assistant Attorney General Andrew Peterson, with the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit said there are two suits against Saseen. A civil suit regarding the overpayments, and a criminal suit regarding the falsification of records.

A state audit conducted in 2012 showed that MARC documents had been modified by changing hours and types of service. Auditors found that MARC billed Medicaid close to two million dollars in 2009, reaping overpayments that year of 705, 000 dollars. The state wants to recover that amount.

Peterson says Sasseen was the only person to benefit from the overcharges.

 

Categories: Alaska News

Arctic Sea Ice Hits Minimum Extent, 6th Lowest On Record

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 17:42

The National Snow and Ice Data Center this week announced Arctic sea ice reached its minimum extent on September 17th. It’s the sixth lowest sea ice extent since scientists began keeping records back in 1979.

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Ice extent was measured at 1.94 million square miles. According to the NSIDC, this year’s sea ice minimum is below the long term average.
But the measurement is still a preliminary measurement. Changing winds still have the potential to push the ice extent lower.

The NSIDC says it’s still too soon to tell whether the sea ice surrounding Antarctica has reached its maximum winter extent. However, sea ice in Antarctic has been recorded above average in almost all sections of that continent this year.

Scientists expect to announce the Antarctic maximum sea ice extent and official Arctic sea ice minimums minimum some time in October.

Categories: Alaska News

Jurors Reach Mixed Verdict in Unalaska Homicide Trial

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 17:40

Jurors have reached a not-guilty verdict on the most serious charges against two men accused of murdering a coworker at an Unalaska fish plant in 2012. But, the jury couldn’t agree on every count.

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On Monday afternoon, jurors found 36-year-old Leonardo Bongolto, Jr. and 42-year-old Denison Soria not guilty of two counts of second-degree murder each. One count included intent to cause serious injury, while the other was tied an extreme indifference to human life.

Bongolto, from Maple Valley, Wash., and Soria, from Unalaska, were accused of beating Jonathan Adams to death outside a Bering Fisheries bunkhouse in February 2012.

But the jury couldn’t decide if either man was guilty of assault, manslaughter or several other lesser charges. Judge Patricia Douglass declared a mistrial on those counts. That could set the stage for a brand new trial process starting later this year.

In all, the jury deliberated for about 11 hours after hearing more than a week of testimony – from an eyewitness, a bunkhouse neighbor and several police and medical officials involved with the case.

Attorneys showed the jury photos of Adams’ injuries and the bunkhouse deck where he was found the night of his death. The jury also listened to recordings of the eyewitnesses’ call to public safety, and first responders’ attempts to revive Adams at the scene using CPR.

Bongolto and Soria both declined to give their own testimony. They spoke and listened through Tagalog interpreters during the trial.

In closing arguments last Thursday, assistant district attorney James Fayette told the jury that the alleged fight was a result of Bongolto and Soria’s “preexisting aggression” toward Adams, and that it had directly caused Adams’ death.

But defense attorneys said Fayette hadn’t proven either of those things. They questioned the reliability of the states’ witnesses, and argued that neither man had set out to seriously injure Adams when the altercation began.

Jurors were asked to consider each man’s charges separately – and Soria’s attorney, Paul Maslakowski, argued in particular that his client was barely involved in the fight.

The eyewitness who testified called Leonardo Bongolto the “primary aggressor.” But Bongolto’s attorney, James Ferguson, called Adams’ death an accident resulting from horseplay.

Jurors reached their not-guilty verdicts on the murder charges around 5 p.m. on Monday. Before dismissing them from service, Judge Douglass thanked the jury for participating in what she said was an unusually difficult trial.

The state now has the option to pursue a retrial for any or all of the remaining charges in the case. Attorneys will decide how to proceed at a scheduling conference in November.

Categories: Alaska News

Art is Big Business in Southeast

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 17:38

What are the arts worth to Southeast Alaska? A new economic study says painting, carving, theater, music and other creative pursuits generate at least $60 million a year in business.

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Southeast artists include musicians, actors, carvers, painters and educators. (Chart courtesy Rain Coast Data/Southeast Conference)

“When you’re looking at the saturation of artists in the region, we have nearly three times as many of the general U.S. population,” says Meilani Schijvens, director of Juneau-based Rain Coast Data.

In a report prepared for the Southeast Conference, she estimates 2,340 artists live and work in the region. Many do it part-time, but their hours add up to the equivalent of 2.5 percent of workforce.

“Last year, Southeast Alaska artists earned nearly $30 million, just from the arts components of their job,” she says. “And to put this in context, in terms of workforce earnings, the arts sector is nearly twice the size of the regional timber industry.”

It’s also about the same size as Southeast’s financial sector, based on full-time equivalent jobs.

Schijvens says about one in 10 of those surveyed make their entire living in the arts. About six in 10 earn less. And some don’t make any money at all.

“Thirty percent of artists in the region, while accepting money for their work, are actually losing money. So nearly a third of the artists are actually spending more in terms of investing in their artwork than they get paid for doing their art,” Schijvens says.

The total regional arts revenue adds up to almost $60 million a year. That includes spending by artists, customers, organizations and audience members.

“It stimulates business activities. It generates tourism revenue. It attracts and retains a high-quality workforce here. People come here because of our arts community and arts our region has to offer. They stay here because of that. And it boosts quality of life,” she says.

Schijvens says her research shows that Tlingit, Haida and other Alaska Native artists make more money. Twice as many, just under 20 percent, generate all their income from the arts.

“If you look at the average net profit for independent Native artists, it’s 64 percent higher than the average net profit for all Southeast Alaska independent artists,” Schijvens says.

The figures come from surveys of regional artists and organizations. Schijvens says the numbers, spending and earnings are probably larger, since she didn’t reach everyone who could have responded.

The researcher hopes the data will be useful for groups seeking grants or looking for ways to collaborate.

“As a whole, we’re stronger than the sum of our parts. So I hope the artists and arts organizations in the region will come together to be able to leverage more grant funding, be able to do more marketing, let people know what a treasure we have and to be able to take advantage of the larger network of art and artists that we have,” she says.

The report was first presented to the Southeast Conference, an organization of business, government and other leaders promoting economic development in the region.

Categories: Alaska News

Alaska News Nightly: September 23, 2014

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 17:35

Stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via emailpodcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn

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Murkowski Backs Sullivan in TV Spot

Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington, D.C.

U.S. Senate candidate Dan Sullivan has a new campaign ad featuring the person he hopes to call a colleague: Sen. Lisa Murkowski.

Tribes Advance Self-Governance Initiative with Tax Bill

Jennifer Canfield, KTOO – Juneau

A bill that will exempt tribes from taxation on social welfare programs has made its way through Congress and is awaiting the president’s signature. The bill was introduced in response to the Internal Revenue Service’s increased auditing of tribes over the last few years and is part of a national initiative to give tribes the same tax status as local and state governments.

Wasilla Disability Clinic Charged With Medicaid Fraud

Ellen Lockyer, KSKA – Anchorage

The owner of a Wasilla disability clinic has been charged with Medicaid fraud.

Arctic Sea Ice Hits Minimum Extent, 6th Lowest on Record

Emily Schwing, KUAC – Fairbanks

The National Snow and Ice Data Center this week announced Arctic sea ice reached its minimum extent on September 17. It’s the sixth lowest sea ice extent since scientists began keeping records back in 1979.

Anchorage: A Climate Refuge?

Monica Gokey, KSKA – Anchorage

“Alaskans- stay in Alaska.” That was the first line of this morning’s most-emailed story in the New York Times, which looked at which U.S. cities are likely to be most hospitable in a changing climate.

Jurors Reach Mixed Verdict in Unalaska Homicide Trial

Annie Ropeik, KUCB – Unalaska

Jurors have reached a not-guilty verdict on the most serious charges against two men accused of murdering a coworker at an Unalaska fish plant in 2012.

As Students Turn 18, Some Have Real Questions for Political Candidates

Lisa Phu, KTOO – Juneau

As high school seniors in Juneau turn 18, some are starting to take a real interest in how the capital city is run. Last week, a Thunder Mountain High School class took a field trip to a Juneau municipal candidate forum where they posed questions to the candidates.

Art is Big Business in Southeast

Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska – Juneau

What are the arts worth to Southeast Alaska? A new economic study says painting, carving, theater, music and other creative pursuits generate at least $60 million a year in business.

Banned Books Week: ‘Captain Underpants’ Tops List Filled With Literary Classics

Dave Waldron, APRN – Anchorage

Sunday marked the beginning of banned books week, and Loussac Librarian Stacia McGourty says this week is a huge deal for her profession.

 

Categories: Alaska News

Anchorage: A Climate Refuge?

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 17:05

“Alaskans, stay in Alaska.” That was the first line of Tuesday morning’s most-emailed story in the New York Times, which looked at which U.S. cities are likely to be most hospitable in a changing climate.

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University of Alaska biology professor Doug Causey shares a slide portraying Arctic warming over the past 55 years. Slide courtesy Doug Causey.

Hurricanes, floods, droughts and wildfires not your thing? Go north, climate research says.

It might sound like a no-brainer to some, but that idea got a lot of play in the media after a New York Times article pegged Alaska as one of the best places to live as global climate warms.

Camilo Mora is a geography professor at the University of Hawaii and one of the researchers behind the science referenced in the New York Times.

“You don’t want your climate to change, Anchorage is probably the place you would like to be,” he says.

It’s not that Anchorage climate won’t warm up, Mora says — it will. It’s just not forecasted to change as drastically, and as soon, as a lot of other parts of the world.

Last year Mora was the lead author on a well-publicized study in Nature that identified a climate tipping point for many cities in the year 2047. Anchorage, by contrast, wasn’t forcasted to reach its tipping point until 2071, according to Mora’s research. There’s a high margin of error with these models, he says, but what’s not in doubt is that climate is warming.

“The temperatures that you have been used to the past 150 years are going to be a thing of the past.”

University of Alaska biology professor Doug Causey says there’s more to the story. Temperature is one of the easier metrics of climate change to latch on to. And yes, temperatures are warming, by and large. But he says thermometers don’t illustrate the big picture, especially not in Alaska.

“Just talk about the terrestrial environment. Soil erosion. Talk to the folks in Newtok about what they’re experiencing as they watch their town wash away. Or Shishmaref,” Causey says. “People who are used to hunting and fishing at nearby ponds… they’re drying up. The permafrost has melted and so all the waters are draining out of the ponds. Not everywhere and not all of them, but these are the dramatic changes that we’re seeing.”

Causey says, ‘yes, Alaska is cold,’ but it’s not exactly a ‘get out of jail free card’ for climate change.

“Anyone who’s here in Alaska who’s paying attention to it — we’re seeing the change right now. Rain in the Interior: I mean Fairbanks is wetter than Ketchikan or something like that! Fireweed is starting to bloom in July.”

Back in Hawaii, the researcher behind the New York Times article says he’s never been to Alaska. Mora says his research is model-based. The regions that ranked high for livability in a warming climate, he says, are places that are used to change.

“Well, Alaska, from the biological perspective, in our opinion is going to be resilient,” Mora says. “Alaska, and other places at high latitudes are used to a high climate variability.”

He points to himself as an example. Mora says he’s originally from the tropics, a climate with low variability — meaning it’s pretty much always warm. Moving to a place where the temperature changes wildly from one season to another, like Alaska, would be a big change for him.

So is Alaska really the Florida of the future? Mora says he’s not looking into the move just yet. For now he’s putting his money into another air conditioning unit in Hawaii over a plot of land in the Last Frontier.

 

Categories: Alaska News

As Students Turn 18, Some Have Real Questions For the Candidates

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 16:36

Absentee voting for the October 7 municipal election begins today at City Hall and Mendenhall Mall. Juneau residents will choose three Assembly and two school board members, and decide on one ballot proposition.

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Last week, Thunder Mountain High School students had a lesson in civic engagement. The American government class took a field trip to the Juneau Votes Forum at UAS where they posed questions to the candidates.

Areawide Assembly candidate Tony Yorba talks with students after the Juneau Votes Forum. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

“What was the reason for building the Auke Bay roundabout?”

“Why did we build another library next to Thunder Mountain?”

“This is a question for the school board candidates: why does high school start so late in the morning and what are the benefits of that versus an earlier start?”

Coming up with questions was a homework assignment. But before the students could do that, they first had to answer this question in class – what is the Juneau Assembly?

“Uhhh. We have no idea. We were like, ‘It’s a bunch of people who do stuff,’” says student Sarah Morris.

Sarah and her classmates were stumped.

“We were kind of like, ‘This is interesting. We don’t even know what they do.’ And I’m 18. I can vote now. What is this?” Sarah says.

Some students turned to their phones, their teacher gave them her definition and then the class had a discussion.

“And then we just came up that they, like, make laws for Juneau.”

Now that Sarah has an idea of what the Assembly is, she does have some concerns.

“The garbage dump is just horrible and I’m like, ‘Why is it that way?’ And I really think that everybody has really positive opinions about it, but it needs to be changed and just how that needs to be done, I still want to know,” Sarah says.

Classmate David Wolfe didn’t get a chance to ask his question.

Maria Gladziszewski answers more student questions. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

“I wanted to ask if they see the amount of personnel that they have in the government as all essential. I feel like a lot of expenses go towards hiring people and we don’t need as many people in the government system as we do,” David says.

For the school board, Sarah wonders this about Thunder Mountain High School:

“Why don’t we have a nurse there full time? I think that’s really important. I mean, like, everybody is really concerned about the health of the students but, yet, there’s no nurse there. You go at the beginning of the day and you’re like, ‘Can I get some ibuprofen?’ ‘Oh, the nurse isn’t here.’”

Overall, the students were happy they went to the forum. So was teacher Mara Early.

“I’m just really excited that they got to come and merge what they learn in the classroom with real life politics in the community,” Early says.

Chloe Varner is student body president at Thunder Mountain. She says she’s long been intrigued with politics, but only recently has become interested in what’s happening on the city level.

“I just turned 18 so now I get to vote and I get to put my voice out there. I’m just starting to pay attention to what’s going on. I took notes and I’m getting a better idea of who I’m going to vote for,” Chloe says.

Now, the students can focus on their next assignment during this election season. In pairs, the students are researching a real candidate in the municipal or general election and playing the role of that candidate’s campaign manager. The students will develop a campaign strategy, advertisement material and write a speech.

Categories: Alaska News

Gas To Liquids Project Could Cut Oil Production Costs

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 14:20

An Alaska company wants to help reduce the cost of producing oil on the North Slope.  Alaska Natural Gas to Liquids, based in Anchorage, is pitching a plan to construct a gas-to-liquids facility that could save the producers between $50 million and $100 million a year.

Richard Peterson, raspy voiced president and CEO of Alaska Natural Gas to Liquids, (ANGTL) is a mechanical engineer who has been in the energy field for the past forty years.Peterson spoke at a recent Mat Su Business Alliance luncheon to pitch a 650 million dollar project, that, he says, will save costs to oil and gas producers.

“Those producers must import about a hundred thousand gallons a day of diesel. Where do you make ultra-low sulphur diesel in Alaska? Tesoro Nikiski. So the diesel that is required to be used on the North Slope, comes out of Tesoro, Nikiski, has to be transported all the way to the North Slope. Nine hundred miles of transport. This adds an enormous amount of cost.”

 ANGTL would like to bring that cost down, by providing the technology for producing clean burning diesel on site at the North Slope.  According to Peterson, the process that enables natural gas to be converted to a liquid fuel has been around since World War 2. His proposed facility would convert natural gas into a low sulphur, clean burning diesel fuel.

 ”We’d like to bring the first commercial plant in the United States to Alaska, “  he said.

 Peterson showed photos of gas to liquids reactors, at least one now in use by Shell in Qatar, which produces 140 thousand barrels of diesel a day. But other types of reactors produce diesel on a smaller scale. He said that the mega- facilities “don’t translate to Alaska right now,” but the smallest unit, could be adapted to Alaska’s needs, if built correctly.

“To make it economic, it has to be built in modular form.”

 He says the modules could be built in state, and shipped to the North Slope,  although the  reactors themselves would be built elsewhere.

“You cannot stick built stuff like this on the North Slope. The cost is just too high.  So you need to go to places where you can build them, then transport them by road, rail or ship, to the site.  The Valley happens to have three of those, so why wouldn’t you start looking at potentially building those small scale modules in a place like the Valley?”

 Peterson says the small project’s cost, which includes a building to house the reactor, at 650 million dollars, …” is a tad too big for financing within the state, so we are going outside the state.” Peterson did not indicate where outside the state he was looking, although he said Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority [AIDEA] is interested in the project.

He says, in saving oil producers some production costs, his company can help oil companies to do more to create opportunities for small businesses and for alternative energy projects.

Categories: Alaska News

Banned Books Week: ‘Captain Underpants’ Tops List Filled With Literary Classics

APRN Alaska News - Tue, 2014-09-23 08:09

Sunday marked the beginning of banned books week. The celebration involves more than just literature.  Stacia McGourty is a librarian working at Anchorage’s Loussac Library. She says this week is a huge deal for her profession.

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“Banned Books Week is a national holiday for libraries,” McGourty said, laughing.

And that’s because banned books week is all about celebrating the freedom to read what we want. It’s also a way to bring to light the banned books of past and present. McGourty says more books get challenged than banned these days. The challenges, which are the first step of banning, usually come from school districts.

“Because it’s geared towards children,” McGourty said. “And a lot of the challenges come because people believe that material is not appropriate for that age level of that grade level.”

Some of the most banned books in school libraries are classics like To Kill a Mockingbird and Of Mice and Men. But McGourty says the most commonly banned book is one you likely haven’t heard of – unless of course you are a parent of a 10-year-old boy.

“Captain Underpants is probably number one this year,” McGourty said. “It is an elementary-age graphic novel, and it’s basically a super hero cartoon. I haven’t read this book but it’s been super popular. It’s been popular ever since I was in college working at the book store and it’s popular now. We still have kids asking for it.”

Captain Underpants aside, McGourty says these banned and challenged books are usually serious and sometimes absurd censorships.

“In 1987 Anchorage School Districts banned a dictionary for having slanged definitions for certain words,” she said.

McGourty says banning books in a public library is much harder than doing it in a school, but it does happen. She says anyone can try to ban a book.

“Every library has their own process. At ours you would fill out a comment sheet and it would go to the director. You have to be very specific in why you think it needs to be taken off the shelf, you can’t take things out of context and you have to read the entire book,” McGourty said. “It’s a lot harder in a public library than a school library, because we are a library of the people.”

The Censorship Challenge: A Banned Books Pub  Quiz

McGourty says most people at her library bypass the banning process, and take their censorship into their own hands.

“You have plenty of people who check out a book and never return it, because they don’t think anyone else needs to have that book. Or you have people who return it but black out certain things,” McGourty said. “There is a picture book called In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendack. There’s a picture of a little boy, and he just happens to be naked in the kitchen. And sometimes people draw a little bathing suit on the boy.”

McGourty says you might be tempted to think that if a little vandalism is the worst that’s happening, and if most these book challenges don’t end in actual bans, why make such a big deal about Banned Books Week?

“I think it’s important because you should be aware that you have the freedom to read and explore the ideas you want. You think about China and how they block certain Google searches,” McGourty said. “So it’s not just books, it’s really about protecting ideas and protecting access to information. Because libraries offer free and equitable access to information and a place for the community to come together and learn.”

Categories: Alaska News

State Ordered to Improve Voting Materials for Alaska Natives

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:44

A federal judge issued an order to the State of Alaska in a voting rights case Monday. In her 8-page order, U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason said the state must take additional steps to provide voting materials to Alaska Natives with limited English.

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Cori Mills is a spokesperson for the State of Alaska. She says the state is committed to doing everything that was put forth in the judge’s order.

The lawsuit brought by several Native villages alleged that the state has failed to provide accurate, complete translations of voting materials in Yup’ik and Gwich’in. The state argued it had taken reasonable steps.

Nathalie Landreth is an attorney with the Native American Rights Fund or NARF, who argued the case on behalf of the plaintiffs. She says the gist of the 21-point order is that the election information that English-speaking people are receiving must be made available in Yup’ik, and it’s dialects and in Gwich’in.

That includes all the radio announcements about deadlines that one would ordinarily hear on the radio, information about all the ballot measures and all the information about judges. Landreth says the order also mandates the entire official election pamphlet that is printed in English must be available in Yup’ik:

All of this has to happen on a tight timeline before the November election. The order includes deadlines, some as early as this Friday.

Categories: Alaska News

Senate Candidates Vie for Rural Support

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:43

This year’s U.S. Senate race in Alaska is shattering records for spending, with millions in outside dollars directed mostly toward TV ads. With less than two months before the general election, both campaigns are also aggressively seeking an edge on the ground in rural Alaska.

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LaTesia Guinn and Barb Angaiak speak in Bethel. Photo by Ben Matheson / KYUK.

In a Bethel subdivision near the Kuskokwim river, Barb Angaiak is sacrificing this sunny Saturday for politics and she’s made a game plan.

“….two houses kinda down the hill, we’ll hit that, come up here, hit gwens, and hit 245 right there,” she says to herself.

Angaiak is a volunteer canvasser working on behalf of Democratic candidates, including the Begich campaign.

We visit the home of LaTesia Guinn. Angaiak knocks. When Guinn opens the door, the two women make small talk.

This door-to-door effort is a key part of Begich’s strategy for reaching the rural vote. The campaign has 13 field offices around the state, double that of his effort in 2008. They have staff in Bethel for the first time in decades, and the Alaska Democratic Party is advertising for part time village based staff.

Max Croes is the Communication director for the Begich campaign.

“That’ s a show of how committed he is to trying to win votes in rural Alaska and ask Alaskans in Bethel, and The Y-K delta, as well as across the state for the vote (and) have a conversation about the things he’s been able to do for rural Alaska,” Croes says.

The Begich campaign opened the Bethel office well in advance of the August primary which named former Attorney General and Natural Resources Commissioner  Dan Sullivan as his Republican opponent.  Sullivan recently hired a Nome woman, Megan Alvanna Stimpfle, as their rural coordinator to formally ramp up their rural efforts.

Ben Sparks, the campaign manager for Republican Dan Sullivan, says his candidate is also taking the rural campaign seriously.

“The Begich campaign has made it very clear they feel as though they have the Alaska Native vote locked up and nothing could be further from the truth,” Sparks says.

Sullivan has five offices; none in rural Alaska. But Sparks says they have tremendous support and organization in what they call Super Volunteers who reach out with their networks.

“Our campaign is not going to rely on paid staffers, we’re going to rely on prominent members of the Alaska native community going and spreading Dan’s message, and there’s nothing more effective that that.”

Both campaigns say nothing replaces having the candidates meet with voters in person.  Begich visited in July to open his Bethel office and travelled downriver a few miles to the village of Napaskiak. Sullivan has not made it in person during the campaign, but his team say he will be here soon.

Sen. Begich did the next best thing on KYUK’s Friday talk line show.

Mark Trahant is an independent journalist who currently serves as the Atwood Chair of Journalism at the University of Alaska Anchorage and is writing extensively about the Alaska Native vote this year.  He expects millenials – those voters roughly between the age of 18 and 33 – to be a pivotal force and social media to play a big role in the Alaska native vote.

“This won’t be a traditionally fought election, it will be based on turnout,” Trahant says. “And whichever candidate can build a better list of people to turn out is going to be the one who wins. ”

Back on the ground in Bethel, the conversation between Guinn and Angaiak isn’t restricted to the future partisan makeup of the Senate.

“I wasn’t sure why you were coming here, I posted on Facebook that I had a hummingbird in my yard so I’ve had all of these people come by,” Guinn says.

After an hour of door-to-door, Angaiak calls it a day.

“There’s something different happing this year, and that is this coordinated campaign, making sure they know what to do, getting staff out and about to the communities is really really important and impressive and i think it’s the way to go. It’s a different way of running a campaign.”

But in a year in which she expects the election to come down to minuscule numbers of votes, she plans to be canvassing again soon.

Categories: Alaska News

State Files Complaint Against Medicaid Payment Vendor

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:42

The state has filed an administrative complaint alleging unfair or deceptive practices by the vendor it hired to implement a new Medicaid payment system.

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The claim against Xerox State Healthcare LLC was filed with Alaska’s commissioner of Administration. It follows an unsuccessful attempt at mediation.

It seeks compensatory, punitive and other damages and an order requiring a plan from Xerox by Oct. 15 to resolve problems with the system. The state, in its complaint, also reserves the right to go to court.

The system has been plagued by problems since going live last year. The state said the department was aware of problems but believed Xerox assurances that the system was operational and there was a plan to resolve remaining issues.

Xerox did not make anyone available for comment.

Categories: Alaska News

Deadline Set; Southeast Wolves To Undergo ESA Review

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:41

The federal government has agreed to a deadline of the end of next year for an endangered species review for wolves in Southeast Alaska.

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The Center for Biological Diversity, Greenpeace and the Boat Company sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this year seeking a timely decision on their petition to list the Alexander Archipelago wolf under the Endangered Species Act. The groups filed their petition in 2011. The agency issued what’s called a 90-day finding this March, committing to further review of the region’s wolf numbers.

“When a petition is filed there’s supposed to be a preliminary 90-day finding, 90 days after the petition is filed. And the final decision is supposed to come one year after that.”

Larry Edwards is a forest campaigner with Greenpeace in Sitka. And he notes the federal agency has not met timelines for reviewing the wolf petition.

“The difficulty is that Congress doesn’t adequately fund Fish and Wildlife Service to process ESA (Endangered Species Act) listings. So when you go to court, it’s really difficult to get, even from a court, a good date. The fish and wildlife service is looking at doing this in 2017 and I think we did very well to get this settled and get a date at the end of 2015.”

In a settlement agreement filed this week, the federal government agrees to complete a 12-month finding on Southeast wolves by the end of 2015.

Andrea Medeiros spokesperson for the Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska

“At that time we will announce whether or not we believe that it is warranted to list Alexander Archipelago wolf as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act.”

The petitioners want greater protection for wolves and their habitat on the Tongass National Forest. They argue that populations are declining and are vulnerable to hunting and trapping pressure along with loss of habitat from logging on the 17-million acre national forest.  In particular, they cite past and future logging on Prince of Wales Island and say wolves on POW are in danger of extinction.

Categories: Alaska News

KTVA reporter quits live on-air after stating she heads AK Cannabis Club

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:40

A KTVA reporter announced that she is the president of Alaska Cannabis Club and quit her job during a live broadcast Sunday night. Reporter Charlo Greene, whose real name is Charlene Egbe, has been reporting on the legalization ballot initiative since April.

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KTVA’s news director posted an apology for Greene’s outburst and use of an expletive on Facebook and Twitter but could not be reached for comment.

Greene posted a video on YouTube explaining why she quit so publicly.

“Advocating for freedom and fairness should be everyone’s duty, I’m making it my life work,” she declared in the video. “To uphold what America stands for truly: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Ideals that now need to be defended.”

The Vote No on 2 campaign spoke out against Greene this afternoon. They said they spoke with KTVA’s news director about her biased reporting after a 5-part series that ran this spring.

Kalie Kalysmat, the executive director of the Alaska Association of Chiefs of Police, said she also expressed concerns about Greene’s bias. She says Greene’s reporting has been a disservice to Alaskans.

“When you have a reporter in a major news outlet as this one, professing her own point of view in stories, it’s really a very sad thing and difficult for the public to know what’s true,” she said during the news conference.

A YouTube video of the TV clip has gone viral, and Greene’s IndieGogo campaign to raise $5,000 for voter education on the marijuana legalization ballot initiative is more than half way toward its goal.

 

Categories: Alaska News

EPA’s 404-C Public Comment Period on Pebble Closes

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:39

More than 160,000 official public comments have been received by the EPA regarding their proposed restrictions on the controversial Pebble Mine. But it’s expected that once the final numbers are tallied, there will be hundreds of thousands of comments, both pro-and-con.

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Categories: Alaska News

Murkowski Presses FDA To Clarify Spent-Grain Rule for Brewers

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:37

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, along with beer-makers around the country, is celebrating a recent clarification from the Food and Drug Administration about spent grains.

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The material is a byproduct of the brewing process. Beer-makers often donate their spent grains to farms to use as animal feed. But proposed changes to the rules for animal feed producers had brewers fearing they were going to face a pile of new red tape.

Murkowski, who — in addition to being Alaska’s senior senator — is co-chair of the Senate Brewers Caucus, took up the cause.

In a sternly worded letter to the FDA in April, she said the rules would destroy the symbiotic relationship between Alaska’s brewers and farmers.

But the FDA has been saying for months it was all a mistake. The agency says it never meant to apply the animal feed rule to breweries. That’s now spelled out in the rule.

Murkowski, in a written statement Monday, said she appreciated the FDA’s new approach.

Categories: Alaska News

Arctic Researcher: Social Changes Are As Drastic as Climate Changes

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:36

Academics and researchers have been meeting in Anchorage to bring together studies looking at what sustainability means in the arctic. Andrey Petrov is lead investigator and director of Arctic Frost. He has studied the arctic in Russia, Canada and Alaska for 15 years. He says there is a lot of discussion about environmental changes, but social changes in arctic communities can be even more dramatic. His work looks at human capital and community innovators.

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Categories: Alaska News

Alaska News Nightly: September 22, 2014

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 17:34

Stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via emailpodcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn

Download Audio:

State Ordered to Improve Voting Materials for Alaska Natives

Daysha Eaton, KYUK – Bethel

A federal judge has ordered the state to take additional steps to provide voting materials to Alaska Native voters with limited English.

Senate Candidates Vie for Rural Support

Ben Matheson, KYUK – Bethel

This year’s U.S. Senate race in Alaska is shattering records for spending, with millions in outside dollars directed mostly toward TV ads. With less than two months before the general election, both campaigns are also aggressively seeking an edge on the ground in rural Alaska.

State Files Complaint Against Medicaid Payment Vendor

The Associated Press

The state has filed an administrative complaint alleging unfair or deceptive practices by the vendor it hired to implement a new Medicaid payment system.

Deadline Set for Southeast Wolves ESA Review

Joe Veichnicki, KFSK – Petersburg

The federal government has agreed to a deadline of the end of next year for an endangered species review for wolves in Southeast Alaska.

KTVA Reporter Quits on Air, Dedicates Time to Pot Initiative

Anne Hilleman, KSKA – Anchorage

A KTVA reporter announced that she is the president of Alaska Cannabis Club and quit her job during a live broadcast Sunday night.

EPA’s 404-C Public Comment Period on Pebble Closes

Mike Mason, KDLG  – Dillingham

More than 160,000 official public comments have been received by the EPA regarding their proposed restrictions on the controversial Pebble mine. But it’s expected that once the numbers are tallied hundreds of thousands of comments, both pro-and-con, will be submitted.

NTSB Report Yields Few Clues In Fatal Soldotna Plane Crash

Shady Grove Oliver, KBBI – Homer

A plane crash in Soldotna last summer resulted in the deaths of 10 people. The National Transportation Safety Board released its preliminary findings on the crash this week.

Murkowski Presses FDA To Clarify Spent-Grain Rule for Brewers

Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington, D.C.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, along with beer-makers around the country, is celebrating a recent clarification from the Food and Drug Administration about spent grains.

Arctic Researcher: Social Changes Are As Drastic as Climate Changes

Lori Townsend, APRN – Anchorage

Academics and researchers have been meeting in Anchorage to bring together studies looking at what sustainability means in the arctic. Andrey Petrov is lead investigator and director of Arctic Frost. He has studied the arctic in Russia, Canada and Alaska for 15 years. He says there is a lot of discussion about environmental changes, but social changes in arctic communities can be even more dramatic.

 

Categories: Alaska News

25-Year-Old Rescued After Fishing Boat Sinks

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 16:16

One man is reported safe after his fishing boat sank in Lynn Canal on Sunday night.

Twenty-five-year-old Woody Paul of Haines was rescued by another fishing boat in William Henry Bay north of Juneau after his boat the 36-foot, Kyra Dawn began taking on water and then capsized.

The boat sank in about 900 feet of water about a mile from shore, according to the Coast Guard. Paul was rescued by another Haines fishing boat, the Gabriella.

Paul’s mother, Carol, was able to speak to her son Monday morning from the Gabriella, she said. He told her he went into the water as the boat sank but was able to hang onto the roof of his bait shed. He didn’t have time to put on a survival suit, but was holding on to one. He was in the water about five minutes before being rescued.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Wesley Shipley, watchstander at Sector Juneau, says they were preparing to send an H-60 helicopter from Sitka when the Kyra Dawn initially reported trouble.

But they canceled the flight when they received a report that Paul was rescued.

The Coast Guard prevention unit is investigating the sinking.

A gale was forecasted for Sunday night in Lynn Canal, which led many fishermen to anchor early. But Haines fisherman Norm Hughes, who was headed for anchorage when the Kyra Dawn sank, said the weather kicked up faster than expected.

“I was about a mile out of Mab Island anchorage and you could see this black line on the horizon, coming across up the channel and it was topped with all these white caps. That’s a weather event coming your way. And I didn’t make the anchorage before it hit and it went from one-footers to five-footers in 20 seconds.”

Seven-foot seas were reported and wind gusts at Eldred Rock Lighthouse reached 71 knots according to the National Weather Service.

Categories: Alaska News

Ketchikan Shipyard to Build Two Alaska Ferries

APRN Alaska News - Mon, 2014-09-22 08:31

Adam Beck and Gov. Sean Parnell sign the contact for Vigor Alaska to build two new state ferries.

It’s official: The Ketchikan Shipyard will build two new ferries for the State of Alaska over the next few years. The deal was announced on a very rainy Saturday during a barbecue at the shipyard’s huge, enclosed ship construction area.

Hundreds of local residents showed up for the hastily arranged barbecue celebration at Vigor Alaska’s shipyard. The agreement between Vigor and the State of Alaska had been finalized just a few days before.

Gov. Sean Parnell was all smiles as he announced the terms of the deal.

“The construction contract to build both ferries in Ketchikan at $101.5 million, the economic and job benefits are going to be felt throughout the community, throughout the region and throughout the state,” he said.

The ferries will be the first Alaska Marine Highway System vessels built in Alaska, and Parnell said that when they’re completed they also will be the largest vessels ever built in the state.

“The ferries will be 280 feet long, seat up to 300 passengers and carry 53 standard vehicles,” he said. “Each ferry will feature bow and stern doors for quicker loading and unloading, fully enclosed car decks, and controllable pitch propellers to maximize maneuverability and efficiency. A modified hull design will greatly improve traveler comfort during rough weather, like today.”

Vigor Alaska President Adam Beck speaks while Vigor CEO Frank Foti and Gov. Sean Parnell listen, seated.

Frank Foti is CEO of Vigor Industrial, which operates the Ketchikan shipyard along with other shipyards on the West Coast. He said this contract will let Ketchikan disprove a few myths about Alaska.

“You can’t build anything here. It’s too far. It’s too hard to get things here. There’s not enough workers here. Workers aren’t qualified here. Wrong, wrong and wrong,” he said. “Because what we’re going to do, we’re going to make some ferries, and on the side of them it’s going to say, ‘Made in Alaska.’”

Vigor Industrial bought out Alaska Ship and Drydock a few years ago to operate the shipyard. Randy Johnson is a former ASD owner who stayed on with Vigor Alaska.

Johnson praised the governor for his tough negotiating skills, and for his commitment to building the ferries in Ketchikan. But Johnson saved his biggest praise for shipyard employees.

“To all the men and women I’ve had the pleasure to work with building this shipyard, you deserve this day,” he said. “It wasn’t easy, you all know that. I’ve got tremendous respect for all of you. It’s a tremendous opportunity and I know these ships that are going to be built in this facility are going to make everyone in this room proud and I’m just happy I was able to have a part in it. Thank you all.”

Following the speeches, Parnell and Vigor Alaska President Adam Beck signed the agreement, with shipyard employees crowded behind to witness the event.

Both of the new vessels will be day boats to serve the Lynn Canal route between Juneau, Haines and Skagway. Beck said the design is somewhat different than the original proposal, which had called for an open car deck.

“I think the public, rightfully so, was very much interested in a closed car deck, given where it was going to operate, and the department listened to the public input, so now we’re building a fully enclosed car deck with a drive through,” he said.

Despite that addition, value engineering elsewhere kept the contract under the state’s $120 million limit. Beck said the ships will be no-frills vessels that will get the job done.

“It’s going to be day boats that are going to carry people and cars and get you from point A to Point B,” he said. “I think that’s what the state needs, and we’ll be able to build them within budget.”

Saturday’s announcement wasn’t unexpected. Vigor has been working with the state on designing the two day boats, and through that agreement had first dibs on the contract to build the vessels.

The multi-million-dollar ferry contract calls for delivery of the two vessels by 2018.

Categories: Alaska News
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